Events

Calendar

November 2016

SHOPTALKS

Christopher Trapani - A Strong Sense of Place

  • Wednesday, 2 November 2016 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

What does it mean for a work of art to be infused with the spirit of a particular place? Does the locus of creation necessarily permeate a work? Are distant locales and traditions fair game for artists to evoke and imitate, or is that a form of opportunistic exoticism, an indulgent tourist's travelogue?  And in what ways can we expect the city of Rome to make itself felt in the art we'll be producing here?

A look and a listen at a few approaches to these questions, drawn from my recent compositions.

Christopher Trapani is the Luciano Berio Rome Prize Fellow in Musical Composition at the American Academy in Rome.

The lecture will be held in English. You can watch this event livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

    Lecture

    Letizia Battaglia - The Photographer and the City - Palermo CANCELLED

    • Thursday, 3 November 2016 - 6:30pm
    AAR Lecture Room
    Rome
    Letizia Battaglia, La Bambina ed il buio, 1980.

    DUE TO UNFORESEEN CIRCUMSTANCES, THE TALK BY LETIZIA BATTAGLIA ON NOVEMBER 3 HAS BEEN CANCELLED.

    Sicilian photographer and photojournalist Letizia Battaglia, born in Palermo in 1935, has dedicated much of her career to photographing her native city. “My relationship with Palermo has always been a mix of anger and sweet despair. I see her sickness and it angers me,” Battaglia states. “I would like to leave but I can’t, I love her morbidly and I still have so much to do in my city.” Many of her photographs explore the Sicilian capital at its darkest hour, torn by internecine bloodshed in the 1970s. After years of bearing fearless witness to the mafia’s assault on civil society and its toll on the urban fabric, she found that “suddenly, [she] had an archive of blood.” Her commitment to Palermo also led her to serve as a Deputy of the Sicilian Regional Assembly and play an instrumental role in the restoration of the historic center.

    In this talk, which explores the themes central to the exhibition A View of One’s Own, Battaglia will reflect upon her legendary career as a ground-breaking female photographer of one of the world’s most complicated and fascinating cities.

    The lecture will be held in Italian.

    The event is part of La Quadriennale in città (16° Quadriennale d’Arte) and FOTOGRAFIA, Festival Internazionale di Roma.

    EXHIBITION EVENTS:
    Inaugural Lecture
    Zoe Strauss
    The Phoographer in the City - Philadelphia
    13 October 2016
    6pm, AAR Lecture Room

    Exhibition Opening
    13 October 2016
    6pm-9pm, AAR Gallery

    EXHIBITION HOURS:
    Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays, 4pm-7pm
    until 27 November 2016

    Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

    Conference

    50 Years of Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture: Robert Venturi

    • Friday, 4 November 2016 - 2:00pm to 7:00pm
    • Saturday, 5 November 2016 - 2:00pm to 6:00pm
    • Sunday, 6 November 2016 - 9:00am to 1:00pm
    MAXXI - Via Guido Reni 4A

    A series of events at MAXXI to celebrate the book Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture by Robert Venturi (Fellow 1956, Resident 1967), which has been the source of a renewed interest in the role of architectural history, was widely inspired by Rome and, during the Seventies, generated the opening of many architectural university programs in Italy. See attachment for program of events.

    SHOPTALKS

    Dorian Borbonus - Towards a Funerary Landscape of Imperial Rome

    • Monday, 7 November 2016 - 6:30pm
    AAR Lecture Room
    Rome

    The tombs of Rome have been studied since the beginnings of Classical Archaeology as a discipline. Traditionally, the focus of this engagement is squarely on individual monuments. My project attempts to broaden the perspective towards chronological changes in the entire funerary landscape. Individual monuments are still an important aspect of this narrative, but it also promises to capture the funerary culture of Rome on an urban scale.

    Dorian Borbonus is the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman/ National Endowment for the Humanities Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies at the American Academy in Rome and Associate Professor in the Department of History at the University of Dayton, Ohio. 

    The shoptalk will be held in English. You can watch this event livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome.

    Lecture

    Thomas E. Crow - Rauschenberg and the Need for Myth

    • Tuesday, 8 November 2016 - 6:30pm
    AAR Lecture Room
    Rome
    Robert Rauschenberg, Fetticio Personale (Pincio Gardens), 1953.

    This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: American Classics.

    Robert Rauschenberg spent a crucial period as a young artist in Rome and Florence. Of the works he produced at that moment, most were pitched into the Arno after a single bad review. The imprint of that sojourn took some years to re-merge, doing so when the demands of his art awakened a latent attachment to classical myth, which he rendered through outwardly, almost aggressively anti-classical means. The origins and outcomes of that paradox will be the subject of this presentation.

    Thomas E. Crow is the Rosalie Solow Professor of Modern Art, and Associate Provost for the Arts at New York University. He has authored two influential studies of eighteenth-century French painting: Painters and Public Life in Eighteenth-Century Paris (1985) and Emulation: Making Artists for Revolutionary France(1995). Subsequent publications, including The Rise of the Sixties: American and European Art in the Era of Dissent and the essay collection Modern Art in the Common Culture (both 1996), examine the later twentieth century, while The Intelligence of Art (1999) analyses specific moments in the history of art. Crow’s more recent texts focus on single artists, including Gordon Matta-Clark (2003), and Robert Smithson (2004), and his most recent book, The Long March of Pop: Art, Design, and Music, 1930–1995, was published by Yale University Press in January 2015.

    Thomas E. Crow is the James S. Ackerman Scholar in Residence at the American Academy in Rome in the fall of 2016.

    The lecture will be held in English. You can watch this event livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome

    The event is organized in collaboration with the Visual Studies - Rome Network (ViStuRN).

    Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

    Conversations/Conversazioni

    Daniel Mendelsohn with Kimberly Bowes - Sex and the City: Ancient and Modern

    • Wednesday, 9 November 2016 - 6:30pm
    Museum of Arts & Design
    New York City

    Please join us in New York City for a discussion between writer and critic Daniel Mendelsohn (2017 Resident, 2010 Affiliated Fellow) and AAR Director and Professor of Classics, Kimberly Bowes (2006 Fellow) at the Museum of Art and Design. Mendelsohn and Bowes will have a conversation about identity (gendered and otherwise) and space in both the ancient and modern worlds.

    Wednesday, November 9, 2016 at 6:30 PM
    Museum of Arts and Design
    2 Columbus Circle
    New York City

    This event is free to the public, however RSVPs are required:

    RSVP ONLINE

    Daniel Mendelsohn is an award-winning author, critic, and translator. His essays, reviews, and articles appear in many publications. His books include the international bestseller The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million, which won the National Books Critics Circle Award and the National Jewish Book Award in the United States and the Prix Médicis in France, among many other honors; a memoir, The Elusive Embrace, a Los Angeles Times Best Book of the Year; two collections of essays, How Beautiful It Is and How Easily It Can Be Broken and Waiting for the Barbarians: Essays From the Classics to Pop Culture; and a two-volume translation of the poetry of C. P. Cavafy, which included the first English translation of the poet’s “Unfinished Poems.” Other honors include the PEN Harry Vursell Prize for Prose Style, a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Barnes and Noble Discover Prize, the NBCC Citation for Excellence in Book Reviewing, and the George Jean Nathan Prize for Drama Criticism. A member of both the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Association, he teaches literature at Bard College.

    Kim Bowes is an archaeologist, specializing in the archaeology of late antique religions, domestic architecture, and Roman economics. She received her BA summa cum laude from Williams College, a MA with honors from the Courtauld Institute, and a doctorate from Princeton University. After a post-doctoral fellowship at Yale University from 2002-4, she held assistant professorships at Fordham University and Cornell University, and is currently associate professor in classics at the University of Pennsylvania.  Author of over 30 articles, two books and two edited volumes, she also runs a major field project on Roman poverty in Tuscany, sponsored by the National Science Foundation. Currently Bowes is serving in her final year as Director of the American Academy in Rome, where she also served as the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in Charge of the School of Classical Studies from 2012-2014.

    You can watch this event live at: https://livestream.com/aarome

    For further information, please contact Shawn Miller at  212-751-7200 ext. 344 or s.miller@aarome.org

    The 2016-17 Conversations/Conversazioni series is sponsored by The Helen Frankenthaler Foundation.

    Artist's Book Presentation

    Luca Vitone - Effemeride Prini

    • Thursday, 10 November 2016 - 6:30pm
    AAR Lecture Room
    Rome

    Conceived as a diary, this book recounts a period of waiting for an appointment that never took place. The story takes place during the three months Luca Vitone spent at the American Academy in Rome during the autumn of 2008 as an Italian visual arts Fellow. Page after page record Vitone's vain attempts to reach the object of desire on the phone, the person with whom Vitone had planned to collaborate on a publication. The invisible and unreachable character is Emilio Prini.

    The book will be presented by Luca Vitone, Giuseppe Garrera (Art Historian and Collaborator with Quodlibet), Andrea Cortellessa (Writer) and Stefano Chiodi (Curator).

    The presentation will be held in Italian. You can watch this event livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome

    On this occasion, the exhibition A View of One's Own in the AAR Gallery will be open from 5pm to 8pm.

    This event is part of La Quadriennale in città (16° Quadriennale d’Arte).

    Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

    Benefit

    NYC 2016 Fall Gala

    • Thursday, 10 November 2016 - 7:00pm
    The Morgan Library & Museum
    New York City

    NYC 2016 Fall Gala
    Honoring Laurie Anderson, RAAR'06
    and Celebrating Rome Prize Fellows

    The Morgan Library & Museum (225 Madison Avenue)
    Thursday, November 10, 2016 at 7:00 PM

    RSVP ONLINE

    SHOPTALKS

    Nicole Miller

    • Monday, 14 November 2016 - 6:30pm
    AAR Lecture Room
    Rome

    The talk will be a short presentation of Miller's video and installation work. Using as a foundation the idea of a "conductor", the talk will be a journey through the thought processes and life experiences that come to create a practice in 2016...and how this translates and can be adapted situationally.  

    Nicole Miller is the Chuck Close/Gilmore D. Clarke/Michael I. Rapuano/John Armstrong Chaloner Rome Prize Fellow in Visual Arts at the American Academy in Rome.

    The shoptalk will be held in English. You can watch this event livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome.

    Conference

    The Archaeology of the Future: The Architectural Landscape of Tomorrow

    • Friday, 18 November 2016 - 9:30am to 5:30pm
    MAXXI - Via Guido Reni 4A

    Landscape is a crossroads of different time periods, an immense, ageless ruin. In its various forms, natural landscape is sometimes able to absorb built structures by transforming monuments into natural forms, leaving traces of absence or of memory.

    Contemporary architecture no longer seems able to strive for eternity but merely for an infinitely replaceable present.

    Thus it is worth asking what our sense of place will be in the future and if this will coincide with the role of architecture. How can we confer architectural heritage that will endure and be part of our lives or become the archaeological remains of our future landscape? What value will our historical monuments assume; and if they still exist, what kinds of monuments will they be? How can we preserve them and restore them to our civilization, which is a perpetual construction site?

    The conference will be held in Italian.

    SHOPTALKS

    Kevin Dicus - Waste Not Waste: Managing Refuse in the Roman City

    • Monday, 21 November 2016 - 6:30pm
    AAR Lecture Room
    Rome

    Did the ancient Roman city have systematic provisions for the disposal of refuse? This talk, confronting the prevailing notion that it did not, explores how waste management strategies can be read in the archaeological record. It introduces extra-mural dumps and examines waste deposits found within the city, explaining how they arrived there, why they are present, and what interpretive challenges they hold for the archaeologist. Urban waste, Dicus shows, was carefully curated, a tool used for the development of the urban fabric.

    Kevin Dicus is the Andrew Heiskell Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies at the American Academy in Rome and Assistant Professor in the Department of Classics at the University of Oregon. 

    The shoptalk will be held in English. You can watch this event livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome.

    SHOPTALKS

    Gregory Bailey - Multivalent Objects: the Conservation of Pastiche Artworks

    • Monday, 28 November 2016 - 6:30pm
    AAR Lecture Room
    Rome

    The conservation of heavily restored, altered, or partly falsified artworks presents unique challenges. How are these hybrid artworks to be understood and how are they best interpreted?  This talk presents two recent conservation treatments of compromised objects and considers the multiple states and meanings these artworks embody.  

    Gregory Bailey is the Booth Family Rome Prize Fellow in Historic Preservation and Conservation at the American Academy in Rome and Assistant Conservator at the Walters Art Museum, Maryland.

    The shoptalk will be held in English. You can watch this event livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome.

    Film Screening and Conversation

    Shahzia Sikander, Bending the Barrels (2009)

    • Tuesday, 29 November 2016 - 6:30pm
    AAR Lecture Room
    Rome
    Shahzia Sikander, Bending the Barrels, 2009, Video HD 20' 28". Courtesy of the Artist.

    Occasioned by the exhibition Shahzia Sikander, Ecstasy as Sublime: Heart as Vector, on view at the MAXXI through January 15, 2017, RISD Global, MAXXI and the American Academy in Rome have organized a program of events, including an film screening, a panel discussion, and an artist talk exploring wider issues raised by Sikander’s practice, with special emphasis on drawing and video, and questions of difference.

    Bending the Barrels, part of a series of video works made in South Asia between 2007 and 2009, is  composed of footage shot at the Pakistani Military School of Music in Abbottabad. Through moving images overlaid with songs associated with Pakistan’s colonial past, Sikander trespasses in an all-male enclave and plays with military codes and rituals to complicate received stereotypes about passivity and bellicosity.

    Drawing today still hangs in the balance between biology and thought, between identity and culture, between society and nature, between imagination and technological possibilities. Works on paper reveal the gaps between irreconcilable poles in human experience, embodying the ineptitude of authoritative solutions to slippages and glitches present in the “solutions” proposed by governments and institutions. Drawing, by its indexical quality and immediacy, is well equipped to reflect slippery subjectivity. It holds the potential to disentangle thinking from the impulses towards total solutions, inevitably totalitarian, through critical engagement with images, perceptions, objects and traditions.

    Shahzia Sikander’s (b. 1969) deployment of the tradition of miniature painting articulates a radical lexicon. Interstitial space is central to the artist’s drawing and video compositions. History and storytelling feature prominently in Sikander’s work, which digs fearlessly into literary and visual canons across the proverbial East/West divide. Sikander’s diverse practice investigates the blurred boundaries between fiction and nonfiction, storytelling and history-writing calling into question issues around redaction, perception of authority and independence.

    Other events in the program include:
    Panel Discussion
    Beyond Drawing
    MAXXI B.A.S.E.
    Via Guido Reni, 4A
    30 November 2016 at 6:30pm
    in English with simultaneous translation

    This round-table, moderated by Hou Hanru, will take up the questions that Sikander’s work explores to cast them into a broader discussion about the potential to, in Gayatri Spivak’s words, “productively undo” through drawing. And it will address the medium’s potential to imagine, as again Spivak suggests, “a new space that allows us to survive in the singular and unverifiable.”

    Speakers include: Shahzia Sikander, Rashwan Abdelbaki, Dawn Clements, Tomaso De Luca, Anne Palopoli, and Prandeep Sharma.

    Artist Talk
    Shahzia Sikander
    RISD EHP
    Piazza Cenci, 56
    1 December 2016 at 5pm
    in English

    Conversation and Workshop
    MAXXI B.A.S.E.
    Via Guido Reni, 4A
    3 December 2016
    11:30am - Conversation between Shahzia Sikander and Anna Melograno
    in English with simultaneous translation
    3pm - Workshop with Shahzia Sikander
    in English

    Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.