Events

Calendar

October 2017

SHOPTALKS

Peter Benson Miller - Painting in the Contact Zone: American Artists in Postwar Rome

  • Monday, 2 October 2017 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome
Philip Guston, The Tormentors, 1947-48, oil on canvas. San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (c) Estate of Philip Guston.

In the decades following the Second World War, Rome was a productive workplace for American artists and intellectuals. According to the internationally-minded Italian artist Piero Dorazio, one of the founders of the group Forma 1, “Rome was like Paris, it had become the navel of art in Europe. Americans were no longer going to Paris—that had been in the twenties and thirties. In the fifties, Rome was full of artists.” The image of Rome as a “second Paris” was also broadcast in 1952 by an article in Life entitled “Americans in Italy,” which declared that “at the end of World War II artists from all over the U.S. began to head for Italy where, for the past six years, they have swarmed the hillsides and made Rome the rival of Paris as art headquarters.” Awed by historical grandeur and artistic forebears in Italy, American artists also encountered a complex contemporary art world of entangled Cold War cultural politics, ideological struggles, and aesthetic debates. This talk will reconsider several American artists in Rome in this period—focusing in particular on Philip Guston—traditionally viewed in biographical isolation, foregrounding instead the politicized artistic community and the challenges of painting in what cultural historian Mary Louise Pratt has termed a “contact zone.” 

Peter Benson Miller is the Andrew Heiskell Arts Director at the American Academy in Rome. He curated Philip Guston, Roma, which was held at the Museo Carlo Bilotti- Aranciera di Villa Borghese, Rome, and traveled to the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C. At the Academy, his exhibitions include: Cy Twombly, Photographer (2015); Studio Systems (2016); and Charles Ray, Mountain Lion Attacking a Dog (2017). He is the editor of Go Figure! New Perspectives on Guston, published in 2015 by New York Review Books and the American Academy in Rome.

The shoptalk will be held in English. You can watch this event livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Lecture

William Jordan – King Louis IX’s Other Converts

  • Tuesday, 3 October 2017 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome
Felix Bonfils, Old Walls of Acre, 1878. NYPL Digital Collections.

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: East and West.

Modern biographies of Louis IX discuss at considerable length his efforts to convert the Jews to Christianity.  Perhaps because he was a crusader king, however, scholars have paid little attention to any aspects of his relations with Muslims except those pertaining to war and diplomacy. Yet, as William Jordan will make plain in this lecture, the king's interest and actions in promoting conversions of Muslims to the Catholic faith turn out to be well worth exploring.

William Jordan is Dayton-Stockton Professor of History and Chairman of the History Department at Princeton University. He is the Lester K. Little Scholar of Medieval Studies at the American Academy in Rome in the fall of 2017.

The event will be held in English. You can watch this event livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Inaugural Lecture

Dacia Maraini

  • Thursday, 12 October 2017 - 5:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome
Fosco Maraini, Donna all'interno di un "Sasso" di Matera, c. 1950. Gabinetto Vieusseux©Fratelli Alinari.

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: East and West.

Dacia Maraini's talk will open the exhibition Matera Imagined/Matera Immaginata: Photography and a Southern Italian.

The celebrated writer, critic, and theater producer Dacia Maraini will discuss her thoughts on writing, travel, Italy, and the South in the context of the Academy’s fall exhibition, Matera Imagined/Matera Immaginata: Photography and a Southern Italian Town. Daughter of Topazia Alliata, a Sicilian princess, and Fosco Maraini, a Tuscan ethnographer and photographer whose images of Matera are featured in the exhibition, Maraini for decades has used literature as a way to explore Italy and its culture with both profound intimacy and intellectual rigor. Her numerous, critically-acclaimed novels and plays have given voice and agency to women of all walks of life. Like her close friend Pier Paolo Pasolini, whose film, The Gospel According to Saint Matthew (1964), was shot in Matera, Maraini often empowers characters in her stories who struggle to find places for themselves in reality. An avid traveler and keen observer, Maraini will share her unique perspectives on southern Italy and its portrayal through the arts.

Seating on a first-come, first-served basis. Doors open at 5pm.

EXHIBITION EVENTS

Exhibition Opening
12 October 2017
6:30pm-9pm AAR Gallery

Curator Lecture
Lindsay Harris
Matera Imagined
16 October 2017
6:30pm, AAR Lecture Room

Lecture
Emmet Gowin
A Life in Photography
14 November 2017
6:30pm, AAR Lecture Room

Conversation
Mario Cresco with Roberta Valtorta
Photography and Matera
21 November 2017
6:30pm, AAR Lecture Room

GALLERY HOURS

Thursday-Sunday, 4pm-7pm
12 October- 26 November 2017

The exhibition will also be open on 16 October, 14 November and 21 November from 5pm to 8pm.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Exhibition Opening

Matera Imagined/Matera Immaginata: Photography and a Southern Italian Town

  • Thursday, 12 October 2017 - 6:30pm to 9:00pm
AAR Gallery
Rome
Carrie Mae Weems, Matera-Ancient Rome, 2006. Courtesy of Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: East and West.

Dacia Maraini will open the exhibition with a talk at 5:30pm in the AAR Lecture Room. 

Piergiorgio Branzi, Esther Bubley, Mario Carbone, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Mario Cresci, Marjory Collins, Luigi Ghirri, Emmet Gowin, Fosco Maraini, David Seymour, Augusto Viggiano, Carrie Mae Weems, Dan Weiner, Joseph Williams e Yasmin Vobis. 

Organized by the American Academy in Rome, this exhibition highlights how photography has framed modern perceptions of Matera, a southern Italian town noted for its millennia-old cave dwellings. A palimpsest of history and traditions characteristic of Mediterranean culture, Matera in the twentieth century was transformed in the collective imagination from an ancient backwater at the edge of civilization to a cultural bellwether for the future of Europe. In the 1940s, following the publication of Italian author Carlo Levi’s best-selling memoir, Christ Stopped at Eboli, Matera became a symbol of southern Italian backwardness. Today, just over a generation later, Matera has emerged as a model of authenticity that will represent Europe as Capital of Culture in 2019. 

The exhibition charts Matera’s recent evolution through photography. It highlights for the first time the town's constant allure for photographers around the globe, as well as their pivotal role in transforming what Levi termed Matera’s “tragic beauty” into a symbol of ageless, Mediterranean place. Like filmmakers Pierpaolo Pasolini or Mel Gibson, who used Matera as a surrogate for Jerusalem, the photographers who ventured to Matera observed in its cave dwellings signs of the origins of civilization. At the same time, as was true of New Deal era photography in the United States, photography in Matera in the postwar years played a decisive role in shaping public policy, land reform, and social change. More recently, Matera has inspired artists to explore through photography concepts ranging from memory and perception, to identity and cultural patrimony. Featuring works by some of the most celebrated photographers of their time, including Henri Cartier-Bresson, Esther Bubley, Luigi Ghirri, Emmet Gowin, David Seymour, and Carrie Mae Weems, the exhibition presents a new narrative about Matera’s ancient heritage. 

Matera Imagined/Matera Immaginata: Photography and a Southern Italian Town is curated by Lindsay Harris, Andrew W. Mellon Professor of the Humanities at the American Academy in Rome.

The exhibition and catalogue are made possible by Fondazione Matera Basilicata 2019. Additional support provided by Richard Baron and Adi Shamir Baron.

Matera Imagined/Matera Immaginata: Photography and a Southern Italian Town travels to the Museo nazionale d’arte medievale e moderna, Palazzo Lanfranchi in Matera from 7 December 2017 to 4 February 2018 as part of a series of events celebrating Matera as the European Capital of Culture 2019. 

EXHIBITION EVENTS

Inaugural Lecture
Dacia Maraini
12 October 2017
5:30pm, AAR Lecture Room

Curator Lecture
Lindsay Harris
Matera Imagined
16 October 2017
6:30pm, AAR Lecture Room

Lecture
Emmet Gowin
A Life in Photography
14 November 2017
6:30pm, AAR Lecture Room

Conversation
Mario Cresco with Roberta Valtorta
Photography and Matera
21 November 2017
6:30pm, AAR Lecture Room

GALLERY HOURS

Thursday-Sunday, 4pm-7pm
12 October- 26 November 2017

The exhibition will also be open on 16 October, 14 November and 21 November from 5pm to 8pm.
 

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Tour

Giornata FAI d’Autunno

  • Sunday, 15 October 2017 - 10:00am to 6:00pm
McKim, Mead & White Building
Rome

The American Academy in Rome will be participating in Giornata FAI d’Autunno and will offer guided tours in Italian of the Villa Aurelia and the McKim, Mead, & White Building, including the Cortile, Salone, Billiards Room, Arthur & Janet C. Ross Library, and Bass Garden. 

For further information, visit https://www.giornatefai.it/

The mission of FAI (Fondo Ambiente Italiano, often referred to as the Italian National Trust) is twofold: on the one hand, it is to promote a tangible culture of respect for Italy's natural heritage, art, history and traditions; and on the other, it is to protect a legacy that forms a fundamental part of the roots and identity of the Italian people. FAI is a national, not-for-profit trust that was set up in 1975 and has since gone on to save, restore and open to the public numerous fine examples of Italy's artistic and natural heritage. 

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.
 

SHOPTALKS

Lindsay Harris - Matera Imagined/Matera Immaginata: Photography and a Southern Italian Town

  • Monday, 16 October 2017 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome
David Seymour, A peasant girl leading her family's horse back from the fields to her cave home. Matera, Basilicata, Italy, 1948. Magnum Photos©David Seymor/Magnum Photos.

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: East and West.

In the twentieth century, the southern Italian town of Matera has evolved in the collective imagination from an ancient backwater at the edge of civilization to a cultural bellwether for the future of Europe.  In the 1940s, following the publication of Italian author Carlo Levi’s best-selling memoir, Christ Stopped at Eboli, Matera became a symbol of southern Italian backwardness.  Today, just over a generation later, Matera has emerged as a model of authenticity that will represent Europe as Capital of Culture in 2019. In conjunction with the Academy's fall exhibition, Matera Imagined/Matera Immaginata: Photography and a Southern Italian Town, this talk will explore Matera's recent evolution through photography.

Lindsay Harris is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor of the Humanities at the American Academy in Rome and curator of the exhibition Matera Imagined/Matera Immaginata: Photography and a Southern Italian Town, which is currently on show in the Gallery of the American Academy until 26 November 2017.

The event will be held in English. You can watch it livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome. On this occasion, the exhibition will be open from 5pm to 8pm.

EXHIBITION EVENTS

Inaugural Lecture
Dacia Maraini
12 October 2017
5:30pm, AAR Lecture Room

Exhibition Opening
12 October 2017
6:30pm-9pm, AAR Gallery

Lecture
Emmet Gowin
A Life in Photography
14 November 2017
6:30pm, AAR Lecture Room

Conversation
Mario Cresco with Roberta Valtorta
Photography and Matera
21 November 2017
6:30pm, AAR Lecture Room

GALLERY HOURS

Thursday-Sunday, 4pm-7pm
12 October- 26 November 2017

The exhibition will also be open on 16 October, 14 November and 21 November from 5pm to 8pm.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Conference

The Political Power of Sacred Texts

  • Thursday, 19 October 2017 - 9:00am to 6:00pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: East and West.

Sacred texts, catalyzed through extremely different hermeneutical approaches, have had great political influence in both Eastern and Western cultures.  This conference explores the interaction between canonical texts and the array of hermeneutical modes – from fundamentalism to contemporary philosophy – through which they are culturally activated.  Do sacred texts and their specific normative content actually have political influence? Or are they just objects of use or abuse by players whose ideologies are informed by motivations independent of the sacred texts they advocate? What cultural contexts favor fundamentalist approaches, and where do open-perspective philosophical attitudes towards sacred texts develop?  Is there any possibility for mutual illumination among advocates of these seemingly incommensurate positions? These issues will be discussed in a keynote address followed by a one-day conference. Scholars from different religious backgrounds will analyze test cases, showing how specific sacred texts have been used in diverse historical and cultural contexts as well as their contemporary political relevance. Scholars from philosophy and cultural studies will explore, from their perspectives, how these issues can be approached.

Please see the attachment below for the complete program of speakers.

This conference is co-sponsored by American Academy in Rome and the Pontifical Biblical Insititute.

The event will be held in English. You can watch this event livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Panel Discussion

Rome Prize Informational Session in Los Angeles

  • Friday, 20 October 2017 - 6:00pm to 7:00pm
SCI-Arc – Library Gallery
Los Angeles

The American Academy in Rome, in conjunction with SCI-Arc, invites you to an information session on the 2018 Rome Prize. Mark Robbins, President and CEO, will lead a discussion on the prize and the Academy with past Rome Prize winners. A short Q&A will follow. 
 

Friday, October 20, 2017 
6:00 – 7:00 p.m.
 
SCI-Arc 
Library Gallery 
960 East 3rd Street, 2nd Floor 
Los Angeles, CA 90013
 
(Parking is available at 350 Merrick Street.) 
 

The American Academy in Rome supports innovative artists, writers, and scholars living and working together in a dynamic international community. Each year, the Academy awards the Rome Prize to thirty emerging artists and scholars who represent the highest standard of excellence and who are in the early or middle stages of their working lives. The winners are invited to Rome to pursue their work in an atmosphere conducive to intellectual and artistic experimentation and interdisciplinary exchange. The Rome Prize consists of room and board, a stipend ($28,000 for full-term fellowships; $16,000 for half-term fellowships), individual work space, and privileged access to Rome. 

The deadline for the national Rome Prize competition is Wednesday, November 1, 2017. Applications will also be accepted between November 2-15, 2017, for an additional fee. More information on the Rome Prize and the online application can be found here

This event is free to the public, however RSVPs are required:


 

For additional information, please contact Shawn Miller at: s.miller@aarome.org or 212-751-7200 x344.

Lecture

Jeanne Gang - Materials that Connect

  • Tuesday, 24 October 2017 - 5:00pm
MAXXI - Via Guido Reni 4A
Jeanne Gang, Writers Theater, Glencoe, IL Photograph (c) by Steve Hall / Hedrich Blessing

Celebrated American architect Jeanne Gang is the founding principal of Studio Gang, an architecture and urban design practice in Chicago and New York. In this talk organized in collaboration with MAXXI, Jeanne will discuss the design process for recent and upcoming projects of various types and scales that use materiality to forge connections between cities, people, and the environment. These projects include the Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership, which was built using a vernacular method that embodies the participatory ideals of the center; an expansion of New York’s American Museum of Natural History that uses the liquid qualities of concrete to echo geological processes, resulting in a flowing central space for exhibition, education, and exploration; the Nature Boardwalk at Lincoln Park Zoo, a restored urban habitat and landmark pavilion in Chicago; and Writers Theatre, which uses wood in tension to create a transparent performance and gathering space that embraces its community.

This event, a collaboration with MAXXI Architettura, is part of the Light On series curated by Pippo Ciorra, Senior Curator of Architecture at MAXXI. The lecture will be held in English.

Jeanne Gang is the William A. Bernoudy Architect in Residence at the American Academy in Rome in the fall 2017.

Conversations/Conversazioni

Gary Hilderbrand with Alberto Iacovoni – Imagining the Vegetal City: The Surface Is Alive

  • Tuesday, 31 October 2017 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome
Reed-Hilderbrand, The Surface of the City is Alive: Central Wharf, Boston, 2012. Photograph by Millicent Harvey.

Gary Hilderbrand, the recipient of the 2017 American Society of Landscape Architects Design Medal and Professor in Practice at Harvard Graduate School of Design, describes landscape architecture’s evolving consequential role in shaping contemporary cities. Urban streets, squares, and parks support the city’s ecological performance and define its spatial experience. Yet much of the city’s living infrastructure remains underestimated or invisible. Hilderbrand’s academic research on the urban forest complements and extends a long arc of design commissions for his firm, Reed Hilderbrand, in New York, Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Austin, Columbus, Tampa, and Boston. In this conversation, Hilderbrand will discuss the urban landscape with Rome-based architect Alberto Iacovoni.

Gary Hilderbrand FAAR FASLA is a founding principal of Reed Hilderbrand LLC in Cambridge, Massachusetts. His firm has been recognized with more than eighty-five regional and national design awards. He is also Professor in Practice of Landscape Architecture at Harvard University Graduate School of Design. He is widely published as an author and critic on landscape architecture practice and has written three monographs: Making a Landscape of Continuity: The Practice of Innocenti & Webel, 1997; The Miller Garden: Icon of Modernism, 1999; and Visible Invisible: Landscape Works of Reed Hilderbrand, published with Douglas Reed, in 2013.. In 2015, Douglas Reed and Gary Hilderbrand were voted among the top five “most admired practitioners” by the members of ASLA’s Professional Practice Network.

Gary Hilderbrand is the Mercedes T. and Sid R. Bass Landscape Architect in Residence at the American Academy in Rome in the fall 2017.

The event will be held in English. You can watch this event livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome

The 2017-18 Conversations/Conversazioni series is sponsored by The Helen Frankenthaler Foundation.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.