Events

Calendar

February 2017

Concert Series

Scharoun Ensemble Berlin

  • Saturday, 4 February 2017 - 8:30pm to 10:00pm
  • Sunday, 5 February 2017 - 4:00pm to 6:00pm
Villa Aurelia
Rome

The renowned Scharoun Ensemble of the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra will offer two concerts to the AAR community and the city of Rome as the culminating events of a week-long residency. This will be the Scharoun Ensemble's ninth annual visit and concert series at the American Academy. They will perform a classical repertoire and a contemporary repertoire featuring music by current Rome Prize Fellows in Musical Composition Jonathan Berger and Christopher Trapani and Italian composer Giuliano Bracci.

4 February 2017 at 8:30pm
Music by Jonathan Berger and Arnold Schönberg 

5 February 2017 at 4pm
Music by Giuliano Bracci, Johannes Brahms and Christopher Trapani

Seats available on a first-come, first-served basis. You are kindly requested to take your seat 15 minutes before the beginning of the performance.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

SHOPTALKS

Andrew Horne

  • Monday, 6 February 2017 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

Andrew Horne is the Arthur Ross Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies at the American Academy in Rome and Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Classics at the University of Chicago.

The shoptalk will be held in English. You can watch this event livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome.

Lecture

Jean-Louis Cohen - Memory Erased/Regained: Marseilles at War

  • Tuesday, 7 February 2017 - 6:00pm
British School at Rome - Via Antonio Gramsci 61
“The Marseille population witnesses the Nazi destruction of the Old Harbor area, January 1943.” Source: Bundesarchiv, Berlin

Published in 2011, Jean-Louis Cohen’s book Architecture in Uniform has recast the accepted vision that saw the Second Word War as an empty period for architecture. Cohen has instead highlighted the many ways it allowed for the victory of modernity. In this lecture, he will present his new research that assesses how these ideas hold true in the case of Marseilles during the Vichy regime and its aftermath.

The cold-blooded destruction of the centre of Marseilles by the Nazis in 1943 and the subsequent reconstruction of the city, which involved, among others, Fernand Pouillon and Le Corbusier, are vibrant episodes in which memory was mobilized in all its manifestations, from the collective, as discussed by Maurice Halbwachs in those years, to the most intimate.

Jean-Louis Cohen is the Louis Kahn Scholar in Residence at the American Academy in Rome in the spring of 2017 and Sheldon H. Solow Professor in the History of Architecture at the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University.

The lecture will be held in English.

The event is organized in collaboration with the British School at Rome and is part of their Architecture Programme: Meeting Architecture III: FRAGMENTS.

Exhibition

Cinque Mostre 2017

  • Tuesday, 14 February 2017 - 6:00pm to 9:00pm
AAR Gallery
Rome

Cinque Mostre 2017 is an annual exhibition of work by current Rome Prize Fellows and invited artists curated by Ilaria Gianni.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Conference

College Art Association Annual Conference (CAA)

  • Thursday, 16 February 2017 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm
New York Hilton Midtown
New York
Meyer Shapiro, Umayyad Palace, Amman, Jordan; 1927; Meyer Schapiro Collection; Box 644, Folder 14; Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Columbia University Library.

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: American Classics.

The American Academy in Rome is pleased to host a roundtable panel session at the 2017 College Art Association (CAA) Annual Conference in New York, "The American Dream of the Mediterranean: Lessons from History," on Thursday, February 16.

Described as “the Middle Sea” or even “the Great Sea,” the Mediterranean has long been celebrated for its centrality and significance as a crossroads of everything from foodstuffs and people to religion, culture, and economic power. In the twentieth century, the Mediterranean took on a new role as a classroom of unrivaled riches for a generation of young scholars who later defined the discipline of art history in the United States. Whether working on the arts of Islam and Byzantium, Medieval France, or Early Modern Italy, the pioneers of art history who took up positions at leading American universities and museums -- including Shelomo Dov Goitein, Richard Krautheimer, Meyer Schapiro, and Kurt Weitzmann -- developed their methods and theories during formative travels along the shores of the Mediterranean.  

Taking a fresh approach to the conference session format, this roundtable brings together scholars in varied fields to discuss the lessons from the Mediterranean that have informed how we see, analyze, and think about art from the origins of art history to today. As many of the art historical trailblazers considered came as refugees to the United States, where they made their careers, this panel also questions what claims can be made, if any, about an “American” style of art history. This session is organized by the American Academy in Rome as part of its 2016-17 programming series, American Classics, which investigates both the classical underpinnings of American culture and the “classic” texts, works of art and ideals that have helped define American identity.

Session Chairs:
Lindsay Harris (FAAR'14), Andrew W. Mellon Professor in Charge of the School of Classical Studies, American Academy in Rome
Avinoam Shalem (RAAR'15), Riggio Professor of the History of the Arts of Islam, Columbia University

Session Participants:
Dale Kinney (FAAR,'72, RAAR'97), Eugenia Chase Guild Professor Emeritus in the Humanities and Research Professor, Bryn Mawr College
Peter N. Miller, Dean, Professor of History of the Medieval and Early Modern Mediterranean, Bard Graduate Center
Martino Stierli, Chief Curator of Architecture and Design, Museum of Modern Art

Panel Session Information:
Date and Time:
Thursday, Februrary 16, 5:30-7:00 pm

Location:
New York Hilton Midtown
Beekman Parlor

To attend the session, please register for CAA at http://conference.collegeart.org/registration/individual-registration/

SHOPTALKS

Robert Clines

  • Monday, 20 February 2017 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

Robert Clines is the Jesse Howard Jr. / Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Rome Prize Fellow in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies at the American Academy in Rome and Assistant Professor in the History Department at Western Carolina University, North Carolina.

The shoptalk will be held in English. You can watch this event livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome.

SHOPTALKS

Silvia Armando

  • Wednesday, 22 February 2017 - 6:30pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

Silvia Armando is the Italian Fellow in Medieval Studies at the American Academy in Rome. 

The shoptalk will be held in English. You can watch this event livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome.

Conference

Projecting Americanism Abroad: Italy in the Cold War

  • Monday, 27 February 2017 - 9:00am to 6:00pm
  • Tuesday, 28 February 2017 - 9:00am to 6:00pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome
Image from "Paisan", Roberto Rossellini (1946)

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: American Classics.

Exploring the Italian-American relationship during the Cold War, Projecting Americanism Abroad, raises new questions with regard to Italy, a vital front in the conflict that has been much neglected. Geography made Italy a critical front in the international conflict. Italy’s borders, directly facing Tito’s Yugoslavia, placed the peninsula at the intersection of East and West; of the free market and communism; of atheism and Christianity. The rise of communism there would have profound repercussions on the Middle East and the future of oil; and it would deny the United States and NATO the use of Italy as a major site for military bases essential for the strategy of deterrence. Rome also possessed a unique cultural and religious importance whose resonance was especially strong because of the history of immigration. The State Department, the CIA, the American labor movement, and the embassy intervened massively in Italian internal affairs through such measures as economic assistance, cultural diplomacy, subsidies to friendly political parties, and extensive covert action. The conference will take a multidisciplinary and international look at  Americanism and its impact on nuclear policy, science, the trade union movement, architecture, film, jazz, literature, music, photography, and cultural diplomacy. 

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (inches 16 x 14 x 6) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.