Publications

Memoirs of the AAR

Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome (MAAR) began publication in 1915, shortly after the union of the American School of Classical Studies in Rome and the American Academy in Rome. The contents of the first thirty-nine Quarto volumes have varied, consisting at different times of collections of articles, monographic studies, final excavation reports, and collections of conference papers.

Volume 40, bearing the calendar date of 1995, initiated a new phase in the life of Memoirs, which has subsequently appeared as an annual journal containing articles in the wide range of fields that have traditionally been important to the Academy. These include classical studies and archaeology, art history, and Italian cultural and historical studies from the Middle Ages to the present. Submissions are encouraged from any scholar working in these fields; formal affiliation with the Academy is not necessary. A new supplementary series, entitled Supplements to MAAR (SMAAR), will accommodate illustrated monographs in art history and archaeology as well as excavation reports.

Guidelines for Contributors For queries and submission guidelines regarding Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome, contact Brian A. Curran, editor.

Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome Volume 56/57 (2011 & 2012)

This volume represents the interest of the American Academy in Rome (AAR), its fellows, residents, and the larger international community who use its excellent library and facilities. The Memoirs series presents a selection of articles on topics including—but not limited to—Roman archaeology and topography, ancient and modern Italian history, Latin literature, and Italian art and architectural history.

Brian A. Curran, Editor
University of Michigan Press
408 pages

This volume represents the interest of the American Academy in Rome (AAR), its fellows, residents, and the larger international community who use its excellent library and facilities. The Memoirs series presents a selection of articles on topics including—but not limited to—Roman archaeology and topography, ancient and modern Italian history, Latin literature, and Italian art and architectural history.

Volume 56/57 includes the following essays and articles: "Parsing Piety: The Sacred Still Life in Roman Relief Sculpture," by Laetitia La Follette; "On the Outside Looking In: Pliny's Natural History and the Portrayal of Invisibility Rituals in the Latin West," by Richard L. Phillips; "Cult and Circus in Vaticanum," by Regina Gee; "Finding His Niche: On the 'Autoapotheosis' of Augustus," by A. J. Droge; "Urbanism and Identity at Classical Morgantina," by Justin St. P. Walsh; "The Visual Dreamscape of Propertius 3.3," by Emma Scioli; "The Pons Sublicius: A Reinvestigation," by Pier Luigi Tucci; "Apollo and Daphne by Antonio del Pollaiuolo and the Poetry of Lorenzo de' Medici," by Luba Freedman; "Leonardo Bufalini and the First Printed Map of Rome, 'The Most Beautiful of All Things,'" by Jessica Maier; "The Matrix: Le sette chiese di Roma of 1575 and the Image of Pilgrimage," by Barbara Wisch; "'Universal History of the Characters of Letters and Languages': An Unknown Manuscript by Athanasius Kircher," by Daniel Stolzenberg; "G. B. Piranesi's Diverse manière and the Natural History of Ancient Art," by Heather Hyde Minor; "Architectural Amnesia: George Howe, Mario De Renzi, and the U.S. Consulate in Naples," by Denise R. Costanzo; and "A Forgotten Dig near Ostia,' by Archer Martin.

About the Author
  • Brian A. Curran, Editor

    Brian A. Curran is Professor of Art History, Pennsylvania State University.    

Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome, Volume 55 (2010)

Published by American Academy in Rome. Distributed worldwide by the University of Michigan Press.

University of Michigan Press
338 pages

Published by American Academy in Rome. Distributed worldwide by the University of Michigan Press.

About the Author
  • Vernon Hyde Minor, Editor

    Vernon Hyde Minor, FAAR'00, is a specialist in Italian art of the 17th and 18th centuries. He has taught in the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Colorado and the School of Art and Design at the University of Illinois. At Colorado, he also was rostered for several decades in the Department of Humanities and Comparative Literature, an inter-disciplinary program. More recently he has been a Research Professor at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

  • Brian A. Curran, Editor

    Professor Brian A. Curran, FAAR'94 has been appointed to a three-year term as the Editor of the Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome (MAAR) effective in September 2010. Until then he will serve as Associate Editor working with Vernon Minor who will have served six years as Editor. An Associate Professor at Pennsylvania State University, Dr. Curran teaches courses in Italian Renaissance and Baroque art, historiography, antiquarianism, and the history and theory of sculpture. Before coming to Penn State in 1997, he was a Teaching Fellow in the Society of Fellows in the Humanities at Columbia University and (from 1984 to 1990) a member of the curatorial staff in the Department of Egyptian and Ancient Near Eastern Art at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. In addition to the Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize (The Robert H.Lehman Foundation Pre-Doctoral Fellowship in the History of Art awarded in 1994), Dr. Curran has received numerous teaching awards as well as fellowships and grants, including a Samuel H. Kress Institutional Fellowship at the Bibliotheca Hertziana in Rome, a Research Grant from the Renaissance Society of America, and a residential fellowship at the Villa I Tatti, the Harvard University Center in Florence, Italy (2005-2006). Dr. Curran received his B.F.A in painting and art history from the Massachusetts College of Art in 1979. He went on to earn an M.A. in art history from the University of Massachusetts /Amherst in 1989 and an M.A and PH.D in art and archaeology from Princeton University in 1997.

Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome, Volume 54 (2009)

The Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome began in 1915 and were published almost annually, with the exception of the years of the two world wars, until 1980.

Vernon Hyde Minor, Editor and Brian A. Curran, Editor
University of Michigan Press
272 pages

This volume from the American Academy in Rome represents the interests of the AAR, its fellows, residents, and the larger international community who utilize its excellent library and facilities. The Memoirs series (MAAR) presents a selection of ambitious articles on subjects represented by the AAR. These topics include, but are not limited to, Roman archaeology and topography, ancient and modern Italian history, Latin literature, and Italian art and architectural history.

Volume 54 includes the following essays: "From Gregory XIII to Louis XIV: The Art and Politics of Reform in France" by Nicola Courtright; "Gregory XIII and Political Pragmatism in the Age of the Pax Hispanica" by Thomas Dandelet; "Pope Gregory Xiii, Jurist" by Jack Freiberg; "Mimesis, Ceremony, Praxis: The Cappella Paolina as the Holy Sepulcher" by Margaret A. Kuntz; "A Dragon for the Pope: Politics and Emblematics at the Court of Gregory XIII" by Marco Ruffini; "Gregory XIII and the Accademia di San Luca in Rome" by Christopher L. C. E. Witcombe; "Three Passages on Tiberius and the Courts" by Leanne Bablitz; "Porta Triumphalis and Fortuna Redux: Reconsidering the Evidence" by Melanie Grunow Sobocinski; "Rewriting Vergil, Rereading Rome: Maffeo Vegio, Poggio Bracciolini, Flavio Biondo, and Early Quattrocento Antiquarianism" by Elizabeth M. McCahill; and "The Art of the Appraisal: Measuring, Evaluating, and Valuing Architecture in Early Modern Europe" by John Nicholas Napoli.

About the Author
  • Vernon Hyde Minor, Editor
    Vernon Hyde Minor, FAAR'00, is a specialist in Italian art of the 17th and 18th centuries. He has taught in the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Colorado and the School of Art and Design at the University of Illinois. At Colorado, he also was rostered for several decades in the Department of Humanities and Comparative Literature, an inter-disciplinary program. More recently he has been a Research Professor at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.
     
  • Brian A. Curran, Editor

    Professor Brian A. Curran, FAAR'94 has been appointed to a three-year term as the Editor of the Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome (MAAR) effective in September 2010. Until then he will serve as Associate Editor working with Vernon Minor who will have served six years as Editor. An Associate Professor at Pennsylvania State University, Dr. Curran teaches courses in Italian Renaissance and Baroque art, historiography, antiquarianism, and the history and theory of sculpture. Before coming to Penn State in 1997, he was a Teaching Fellow in the Society of Fellows in the Humanities at Columbia University and (from 1984 to 1990) a member of the curatorial staff in the Department of Egyptian and Ancient Near Eastern Art at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. In addition to the Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize (The Robert H.Lehman Foundation Pre-Doctoral Fellowship in the History of Art awarded in 1994), Dr. Curran has received numerous teaching awards as well as fellowships and grants, including a Samuel H. Kress Institutional Fellowship at the Bibliotheca Hertziana in Rome, a Research Grant from the Renaissance Society of America, and a residential fellowship at the Villa I Tatti, the Harvard University Center in Florence, Italy (2005-2006). Dr. Curran received his B.F.A in painting and art history from the Massachusetts College of Art in 1979. He went on to earn an M.A. in art history from the University of Massachusetts /Amherst in 1989 and an M.A and PH.D in art and archaeology from Princeton University in 1997.

Symbols of Wealth and Power: Architectural Terracotta Decoration in Etruria and Central Italy, 640-510 B.C. (Supplements to the Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome)

A definitive overview of the evidence for terracotta roofing elements that enhances our knowledge of Etruscan—and more broadly, ancient—architecture.

Nancy A. Winter
University of Michigan Press
728 pages

Although initially intended for the innovative, if prosaic, purpose of providing waterproof and fireproof cover for earlier thatch-roofed homes, fired clay tiles, in seventh- and sixth-century Etruria and Central Italy, combined with Etruscan love of adornment to create exceptional domestic and religious building decoration. Featuring statues and figured friezes of humans, animals, and mythological figures intended to convey the status of the owner or dedicator, the surviving terracotta roofs provide important insights into the architectural history of Etruria. With Symbols of Wealth and Power, Nancy A. Winter has provided a definitive overview of the evidence for these roofing elements that will enhance our knowledge of Etruscan—and more broadly, ancient—architecture.

Jacket illustration: Tuscania, Ara del Tufo, 560–550 B.C.

About the Author
  • Nancy A. Winter

    Nancy A. Winter is an archaeologist and former librarian of the American School of Classical Studies, Athens. She is the author of Greek Architectural Terracottas: From the Prehistoric to the End of the Archaic Period (1993).

The Serpent and the Stylus: Essays on G. B. Piranesi (Supplements to the Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome)

New essays that shed light on the shadowy figure of Piranesi.

Mario Bevilacqua, Heather Hyde Minor and Fabio Barry
University of Michigan Press
280 pages

Piranesi was an architect, engraver, antiquities restorer and dealer, draftsman, archaeologist, furniture and fireplace designer, author, and bookseller. His creations in paper and in stone garnered considerable renown in his own lifetime, allowing him to transform himself from a penniless son of a stonemason to a wealthy entrepreneur. However, despite attempts to catalogue and analyze his work, little is known about Piranesi. Since Henri Focillon published his monograph on the artist in 1918, scholars have sought to expand his interpretive strategies used to examine Piranesi and his work. This volume is a representative sampling of the contemporary scholarship on Piranesi, with each essay scrutinizing a particular aspect of his oeuvre. By engaging with material found in eighteenth-century manuscripts and printed materials, as well as the texts and images Piranesi produced, the nine essays by esteemed contributors add to the rapidly growing and diversifying field of eighteenth-century studies. The outcome is a volume that will add to the expanding, glittering mosaic of Piranesi's life and his work.

Jacket illustration: G. B. Piranesi, engraving with inscription in ink. Biblioteca Corsiana, Rome, 29 H 22.

"The contributors offer a fresh view of Piranesi, one that not only serves to capture an ephemeral 'state of the question,' but should also redirect subsequent research in new and productive channels."
—John Pinto, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University

"These essays help us to see Piranesi in a new light.  Erudite . . . highly readable . . . a major success."
—Marcello Fagiolo

About the Author
  • Mario Bevilacqua, Heather Hyde Minor and Fabio Barry

    Mario Bevilacqua is Associate Professor at the University of Florence, Italy. Heather Hyde Minor is Assistant Professor at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Fabio Barry is Assistant Professor at the American University of Rome, Italy.

Role Models in the Roman World: Identity and Assimilation (Supplements to the Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome)

Featuring world-renowned scholars and essays from a broad range of fields, including literature, art, and historiography, Role Models in the Roman World is a groundbreaking collection at the cusp of the newest scholarship of the classical world.

Sinclair Bell, Editor and Inge Lyse Hansen, Editor
University of Michigan Press
328 pages

"Role Models in the Roman World is an exciting collection, striking for the interdisciplinary range of its contributors and for their vigorous debates—indeed, strong disagreements—about ideas that are currently of fundamental importance in Roman studies: identity construction, exemplarity, memory, monumentality. In framing these crucial issues, and in displaying the range and diversity of current approaches to them, this collection will be useful to every student of the Roman world."

—Matthew Roller, Professor of Classics, Johns Hopkins University

"This collection covers a full range of topics, from how the Romans interpreted their origins from the ashes of Troy on through themes in Roman literature, historiography, declamation, and art, ending with how Christians may have defined their self-presentation in part through reference to earlier, non-Christian models. The editors have shown themselves wonderfully adept at their task, and the result is a uniformly fine volume that will be widely consulted."
—Anthony Corbeill, Professor and Graduate Advisor, Department of Classics, University of Kansas

"Significant essays by leading archaeologists, philologists, and art historians on a theme of central importance in the Roman world."
—Barbara Kellum, Professor and Chair, Department of Art, Smith College

Jacket illustration: Side view of statue of Togato Barberini © Araldo de Luca/CORBIS

About the Author
  • Sinclair Bell, Editor
    Sinclair Bell is a Fellow of the American Academy in Rome.
     
  • Inge Lyse Hansen, Editor

    Inge Lyse Hansen is Publication Manager at the Butrint Foundation; Assistant Professor of Art History at John Cabot University; and coeditor of The Long Eighth Century: Production, Distribution and Demand (2000), San Vincenzo Al Volturno 3: The Finds from the 1980--86 Excavations (2001), Roman Butrint: An Assessment (2007), and Butrint Archaeological Museum: A Catalogue of the Collections (forthcoming).

Cosa: The Black-Glaze Pottery 2 (Supplements to the Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome)

New and reconsidered black-glaze pottery from the Roman Republican colony of Cosa.

Ann Reynolds Scott
University of Michigan Press
304 pages

This study of an important class of ceramics from the key coastal colonial site of Cosa in southwest Tuscany documents the rise of republican Rome to dominance in central Italy in the third and second centuries B.C. The town and territory of Cosa constitute one of the most extensively explored sites of the Roman republican period on the Italian peninsula. Excavation and survey work by the American Academy in Rome and others at Cosa over the past half century have greatly enriched our knowledge of the development of public and domestic urban and rural architecture, the organization and exploitation of the resources of the countryside, and the patterns of economic exchange to which they testify. These latter are particularly evident in the varieties of imported and locally made black-glaze pottery that have been recovered in the excavations. While we tend to think of the ubiquitous Greco-Italic amphorae as the commercial indicators par excellence of mid to late republican Italy, this class of tableware is no less important for understanding both the maritime and inland routes of exchange.

"Ann Scott presents our best picture of Late Republican black-glaze in central Italy from the third through the mid-first century B.C. In Cosa: The Black-Glaze Pottery 2, she reassesses and updates the material published fifty years ago by Doris Taylor as well as presenting more recent deposits of black glazed pottery from Cosa."
—Shelley Stone, Professor of Art History, California State University, Bakersfield

"This admirable study will quickly establish itself as the classic treatment of a topic of central importance for the archaeology of central Italy in the Roman republican period."
—Bernard Frischer, Director, Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities, and Professor of Art History and Classics, University of Virginia

Jacket illustration: Russell T. Scott

About the Author
  • Ann Reynolds Scott

    Ann Reynolds Scott is Lecturer in Classics at Ursinus College.

Excavations in the Area Sacra of Vesta (1987-1996), (Supplements to the Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome)

The definitive work on the excavation of the Temple of Vesta.

Russell T. Scott, Editor
University of Michigan Press
256 pages

Dedicated to Vesta, the goddess of the hearth, the temple of Vesta was one of the most ancient sanctuaries in the Roman Forum. The priestesses of Vesta, known as the Vestal Virgins—Rome's only female priests—were in charge of keeping the sacred fire housed in the temple, while they themselves lived in the Atrium Vestae at the eastern edge of the Roman Forum, between the Regia (originally the residence of the kings of Rome) and the Palatine Hill. Together, the Atrium Vestae, the temple of Vesta, and the Regia formed the religious center of the Roman state until a fire destroyed much of Rome and largely burned all three buildings to the ground in 64 CE. Over the years, numerous excavations have taken place in the area and have often produced unreliable results. In Excavations in the Area Sacra of Vesta (1987–1996), Russell T. Scott compiles a definitive chronology of the history of the Atrium Vestae, clarifying much of the earlier research.

Jacket illustration: Tuscania, Ara del Tufo, 560–550 B.C.

About the Author
  • Russell T. Scott

    Russell T. Scott has taught at Bryn Mawr College since 1966 and served as Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Classical Studies at the American Academy in Rome from 1984 to 1988. He has written widely on Roman history and historiography and the archaeology of Roman Italy, particularly the excavations at Cosa and in the Roman Forum carried out by the Academy under his direction.

The Maritime World of Ancient Rome (Supplements to the Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome)

An exploration of new research on subjects relating to the maritime life of Rome and its vast empire.

Robert L. Hohlfelder, Editor
University of Michigan Press
352 pages

It was not until the third century BCE that geopolitical realities beyond Italy forced Rome to recognize the importance of the sea to its own fate. Two centuries later, following the fall of Egypt in 30 BCE, Rome emerged as the dominant maritime power. Once in place, Rome's dominance of the sea became an important component of its imperial history. No other power before or since has controlled the Mediterranean basin or exercised an imperial naval tenure to such an extent.

Derived from the proceedings of the conference "The Maritime World of Ancient Rome" held at the American Academy in Rome 27-29 March 2003, this volume was conceived to provide a forum for recent research on subjects relating to the maritime life of Rome and the vast empire it created. With contributions from eminent scholars from around the world, this volume builds upon and extends the scope of the American Academy in Rome's first volume on Rome's maritime life, The Seaborne Commerce of Ancient Rome: Studies in Archaeology and History. It will be of interest to scholars investigating maritime aspects of the Roman period and to upper level students studying the maritime affairs of the Roman period.

Cover Credit: Roman merchantman under sail entering or leaving Portus, ca. 3rd century AD. Courtesy Fototeca Unione, AAR.

"From papers on warship slipways to prostitutes, and from piracy to hydraulic concrete, this volume will be a required source for researchers dealing with maritime life in Roman times. As with all good scholarship, the combined gravitas of the contributions here pushes research forward by discussing new fieldwork, reviewing critically previous conclusions, studying evidence in new patterns and experimental archaeology."
—Shelley Wachsmann, Meadows Professor of Biblical Archaeology, Nautical Archaeology Program, Texas A&M University

"The Maritime World of Ancient Rome provides both theoretical and descriptive discussions of recent scholarly work devoted to expanding our modern understanding of the role of waterways and seas in Roman life. Drawing upon history and archaeology through cogent and accessible contributions by top scholars, the collection will stimulate discussion and debate for years to come. Readers will, like me, be inspired by the overarching perspective of the maritime network and its influence on so many aspects of life in the ancient Roman world."
—Cheryl Ward, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Florida State University

"The Maritime World of Ancient Rome is not just of interest to maritime scholars but also to anyone working on the ancient Roman world."
—Hector Williams, Trustee, Vancouver Maritime Museum, and Professor, Department of Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies, University of British Columbia

About the Author
  • Robert L. Hohlfelder, Editor

    Robert L. Hohlfelder, Professor of History at the University of Colorado, Boulder, is a world-renowned expert in underwater archaeology. He has published widely on ancient maritime history, late Roman and early Byzantine history, and ancient numismatics. His many books include King Herod's Dream: Caesarea on the Sea. He is currently at sea leading a National Geographic expedition to Rome, the Amalfi Coast, and Sicily.

Cosa: The Italian Sigillata (Supplements to the Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome)

A detailed description of site findings from one of the most important sources on Republican and Early Imperial Etruria.

Maria Teresa Marabini Moevs
University of Michigan Press
296 pages

This book details Professor Moevs' findings of Italian Sigillata pottery at the Cosa excavation site, an invaluable source of information on Roman colonization, urbanism, and daily life since excavation began in 1948. The exceptional external conditions at Cosa preserved archaeological levels of natural strata from the early and late first century B.C., allowing documentation of the earliest phases of Italian Sigillata, which quickly became a major empire-wide export. This widely used pottery went through many changes in color and presentation during the Roman Colonial era, in response to various transitions and developments in Roman society. The research presented in this volume of the series from the American Academy in Rome will be of great interest to the archaeological and classical studies community.

About the Author
  • Maria Teresa Marabini Moevs

    Maria Theresa Moevs is Professor Emerita of Classics, Rutgers University and author of The Roman Thin Walled Pottery from Cosa (1948-1954).

Obligations in Roman Law: Past, Present, and Future

Long a major element of classical antiquity, the study of the laws of the ancient Romans has gained momentum in recent years as interdisciplinary work in legal studies has spread. Two resulting issues have arisen, on one hand concerning Roman laws as intellectual achievements and historical artifacts, and on the other about how we should consequently conceptualize Roman law.

Thomas A. J. McGinn
University of Michigan Press
384 pages

Long a major element of classical antiquity, the study of the laws of the ancient Romans has gained momentum in recent years as interdisciplinary work in legal studies has spread. Two resulting issues have arisen, on one hand concerning Roman laws as intellectual achievements and historical artifacts, and on the other about how we should consequently conceptualize Roman law. Drawn from a conference convened by the volume's editor at the American Academy in Rome, addressing these concerns and others, this volume showcases the expertise of participants from 11 European and two American universities. The Roman law of obligations—a subset of private law—is investigated in detail, together with its subordinate fields, contracts and delicts (torts). Participants elucidate the relationship between private law on one hand and Roman society and its economy on the other. Chapters also examine whether rules themselves reflect upper-class values and whether it is possible to speak of them as elements of an ideology. This volume includes contributions by Nikolaus Benke, Cosimo Cascione, Maria Floriana Cursi, Carla Masi Doria, Paul du Plessis, Roberto Fiori, Dennis Kehoe, Ernest Metzger, Federico Procchi, Michael Rainer, Salvo Randazzo, and Bernard Stolte, as well as opening and concluding chapters by editor Thomas McGinn.

About the Author
  • Thomas A. J. McGinn

    Thomas A. J. McGinn is Professor of Classics, Vanderbilt University, and past Andrew Mellon Professor at the American Academy in Rome.

Roman Republican Villas: Architecture, Context, and Ideology

The Roman villa is a classic icon of Western culture, and yet villa can be used to cover a multiplicity of ideas, experiences, and places. In the late Republic and early Imperial periods, villas are inseparable from elite lifestyles, providing a prestigious setting for leisurely and intellectual pursuits. But how did these advanced buildings come about? Roman Republican Villas examines key aspects of early villa culture and architecture, with the goal of understanding the development and deployment of villas in Republican Italy.

Jeffrey A. Becker & Nicola Terrenato
152 pages

The Roman villa is a classic icon of Western culture, and yet villa can be used to cover a multiplicity of ideas, experiences, and places. In the late Republic and early Imperial periods, villas are inseparable from elite lifestyles, providing a prestigious setting for leisurely and intellectual pursuits. But how did these advanced buildings come about? Roman Republican Villas examines key aspects of early villa culture and architecture, with the goal of understanding the development and deployment of villas in Republican Italy. For instance, where does the "classic" villa architecture originate? How do writers like Cato the Elder or Varro use the villa to their own advantage? How visible are Republican villas in the landscape of central Italy?

Traditional theories about villa development have been largely focused on stereotypical ideals of early Roman austerity and industriousness. New work at sites such as the Auditorium, however, proves the existence of luxurious residences already by the 5th-4th c. BCE, even before the Roman conquest of Italy. Such recent developments in archaeological fieldwork have begun to reshape the discourse in such a way that old assumptions are being challenged and, in many cases, found wanting. Within this atmosphere of new discoveries and reconsideration, scholars are uniquely poised to re-examine the villa and the part it played in the culture of Roman Italy, in terms of both the material remains and the literary sources. The villa also plays a prominent role in Republican literature such as the De agri cultura of Cato and the texts of Varro, as the early Latin authors seek to fashion identities for themselves and the city of Rome. Drawing on diverse source materials, the collected essays of Roman Republican Villas help to re-center the discussion of Roman villa culture, particularly in light of new evidence offered both by fieldwork and by new approaches to Republican agricultural writers.

This volume brings together scholars of Latin literature, Roman history, and classical archaeology to offer a multidisciplinary approach to the questions connected to the emergence and development of villas and their farming culture. With contributions from leading scholars Jeffrey A. Becker, John Bodel, Stephen L. Dyson, Carin M. C. Green, Brendon Reay, Nicola Terrenato, Mario Torelli, and Rita Volpe, the viewpoints offered build upon previous scholarship and ask challenging questions about how the evidence of Roman villas has traditionally been interpreted.

About the Author
  • Jeffrey A. Becker & Nicola Terrenato

    Jeffrey A. Becker is a Roman archaeologist trained at Franklin & Marshall College and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is managing director and co-principal investigator of the Gabii Project in central Italy. Nicola Terrenato is Professor of Classical Archaeology at the University of Michigan and directs the ongoing archaeological excavations at Gabii, east of Rome.