Events

Calendar

November 2018

Fellow Shoptalks

Shoptalks – Liana Brent and Jessie Marino

  • Monday, 5 November 2018 - 6:00pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

Liana Brent
Step Back, You’re Digging Kind of Close
So often explored from the perspective of monuments and memory, Roman funerary archaeology is in its infancy insofar as it considers the role of the body in mortuary practices. In this shoptalk, Liana Brent argues for new ways of studying bodies, bones, and burials in Roman archaeology with select case studies from her archaeological fieldwork.

Liana Brent is the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation/Samuel H. Kress Foundation Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies and a PhD candidate in the Department of Classics at Cornell University.

Jessie Marino
Fluidity of Musical Materials
Jessie Marino will discuss how to make music out of materials which extend beyond the sonic field.

Jessie Marino is the Luciano Berio Rome Prize Fellow in Musical Composition and adjunct faculty in the Department of Sound at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

The shoptalks will be held in English. Watch this event livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome.

Please note: a valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Thomas Spencer Jerome Lecture Series

Robin Lane Fox – The Natural World: Pagans and Christians – Cosmos and Landscape

  • Tuesday, 6 November 2018 - 6:00pm
Villa Aurelia
Rome
Detail of an Antioch mosaic (526–40 CE) at the Worcester Art Museum

The Thomas Spencer Jerome Lectures Series is among the most prestigious international platforms for the presentation of new work on Roman history and culture. They are presented at both the American Academy in Rome and the University of Michigan. In 2018, the forty-fifth year of the lecture series, Robin Lane Fox, a noted scholar of ancient history, will discuss the natural world in pagan and Christian Rome.

The lectures will explore the differing approaches to the natural world by pagans and the early Christians, from Paul and the Gospels to circa 500 CE. They will bring out differing emphases in their respective writings and art and will ask what practical effects such different ways of seeing had on contemporary life.

Lecture I
November 6, 6:00pm

Villa Aurelia, American Academy in Rome
Largo di Porta San Pancrazio 1, Rome

Lecture II
November 8, 6:00pm

British School at Rome
Antonio Gramsci 61, Rome

Lecture III
November 12, 6:00pm

Lecture Room, American Academy in Rome
Via Angelo Masina 5, Rome

The first lecture, “Cosmos and Landscape,” will delve into pagan and Christian views of creation. It will also investigate the dominance of humankind over the beasts and the vegetal world, as well as modern theories of a shift from a horizontal view to a vertical perspective of the relation between the natural world and the divine, which Christianity endorsed. 

In the second lecture, “Animal and Vegetable,” Lane Fox will address the hierarchy and symbolism of animals and plants in pagan and Christian art. The impact of these views on both groups’ experience, including martyrs and Christian holy men in isolated settings, will be considered. (This lecture will be held at the British School at Rome.) 

The final lecture, “Signs and Catastrophes,” will reflect upon the previous two and compare omens and signs, prodigies and miracles, in pagan and Christian worldviews. A particular focus will be explanations of natural catastrophes, including volcanic and seismic disasters, which are still part of our world today. The lecture will conclude with reflections on the end of the world and the perverted natural symbols used to address it.

Robin Lane Fox is an ancient historian and gardening writer best known for his works on Alexander the Great. He is an emeritus fellow of New College, Oxford, and a reader in ancient history at the University of Oxford. A fellow and tutor in ancient history at New College from 1977 to 2014, Fox now serves as garden master and as extraordinary lecturer in ancient history for both New and Exeter Colleges. His major publications, for which he has won literary prizes, include studies of Alexander the Great and ancient Macedon, Christianity and Paganism, and the Greek Dark Ages. His most recent book, published in 2015, concerns the patristic author Augustine of Hippo. Lane Fox is also the gardening correspondent of the Financial Times.

Thomas Spencer Jerome (1864–1914) was an American lawyer and a lover of Roman history who lived on Capri from 1899 until his death. In his will he endowed a series of lectures to be jointly administered by the University of Michigan and the American Academy in Rome, to be delivered at both institutions. The revised lectures are typically published by the University of Michigan Press.

All lectures will be given in English. The lectures on November 6 and 12 will be livestreamed at livestream.com/aarome.

Please note: a valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Thomas Spencer Jerome Lecture Series

Robin Lane Fox – The Natural World: Pagans and Christians – Animal and Vegetable

  • Thursday, 8 November 2018 - 6:00pm
British School at Rome
Rome
Detail of an Antioch mosaic (526–40 CE) at the Worcester Art Museum

The Thomas Spencer Jerome Lectures Series is among the most prestigious international platforms for the presentation of new work on Roman history and culture. They are presented at both the American Academy in Rome and the University of Michigan. In 2018, the forty-fifth year of the lecture series, Robin Lane Fox, a noted scholar of ancient history, will discuss the natural world in pagan and Christian Rome.

The lectures will explore the differing approaches to the natural world by pagans and the early Christians, from Paul and the Gospels to circa 500 CE. They will bring out differing emphases in their respective writings and art and will ask what practical effects such different ways of seeing had on contemporary life.

Lecture I
November 6, 6:00pm

Villa Aurelia, American Academy in Rome
Largo di Porta San Pancrazio 1, Rome

Lecture II
November 8, 6:00pm

British School at Rome
Antonio Gramsci 61, Rome

Lecture III
November 12, 6:00pm

Lecture Room, American Academy in Rome
Via Angelo Masina 5, Rome

The first lecture, “Cosmos and Landscape,” will delve into pagan and Christian views of creation. It will also investigate the dominance of humankind over the beasts and the vegetal world, as well as modern theories of a shift from a horizontal view to a vertical perspective of the relation between the natural world and the divine, which Christianity endorsed. 

In the second lecture, “Animal and Vegetable,” Lane Fox will address the hierarchy and symbolism of animals and plants in pagan and Christian art. The impact of these views on both groups’ experience, including martyrs and Christian holy men in isolated settings, will be considered. (This lecture will be held at the British School at Rome.) 

The final lecture, “Signs and Catastrophes,” will reflect upon the previous two and compare omens and signs, prodigies and miracles, in pagan and Christian worldviews. A particular focus will be explanations of natural catastrophes, including volcanic and seismic disasters, which are still part of our world today. The lecture will conclude with reflections on the end of the world and the perverted natural symbols used to address it.

Robin Lane Fox is an ancient historian and gardening writer best known for his works on Alexander the Great. He is an emeritus fellow of New College, Oxford, and a reader in ancient history at the University of Oxford. A fellow and tutor in ancient history at New College from 1977 to 2014, Fox now serves as garden master and as extraordinary lecturer in ancient history for both New and Exeter Colleges. His major publications, for which he has won literary prizes, include studies of Alexander the Great and ancient Macedon, Christianity and Paganism, and the Greek Dark Ages. His most recent book, published in 2015, concerns the patristic author Augustine of Hippo. Lane Fox is also the gardening correspondent of the Financial Times.

Thomas Spencer Jerome (1864–1914) was an American lawyer and a lover of Roman history who lived on Capri from 1899 until his death. In his will he endowed a series of lectures to be jointly administered by the University of Michigan and the American Academy in Rome, to be delivered at both institutions. The revised lectures are typically published by the University of Michigan Press.

All lectures will be given in English. The lectures on November 6 and 12 will be livestreamed at livestream.com/aarome.

Please note: a valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Thomas Spencer Jerome Lecture Series

Robin Lane Fox – The Natural World: Pagans and Christians – Signs and Catastrophes

  • Monday, 12 November 2018 - 6:00pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome
Detail of an Antioch mosaic (526–40 CE) at the Worcester Art Museum

The Thomas Spencer Jerome Lectures Series is among the most prestigious international platforms for the presentation of new work on Roman history and culture. They are presented at both the American Academy in Rome and the University of Michigan. In 2018, the forty-fifth year of the lecture series, Robin Lane Fox, a noted scholar of ancient history, will discuss the natural world in pagan and Christian Rome.

The lectures will explore the differing approaches to the natural world by pagans and the early Christians, from Paul and the Gospels to circa 500 CE. They will bring out differing emphases in their respective writings and art and will ask what practical effects such different ways of seeing had on contemporary life.

Lecture I
November 6, 6:00pm

Villa Aurelia, American Academy in Rome
Largo di Porta San Pancrazio 1, Rome

Lecture II
November 8, 6:00pm

British School at Rome
Antonio Gramsci 61, Rome

Lecture III
November 12, 6:00pm

Lecture Room, American Academy in Rome
Via Angelo Masina 5, Rome

The first lecture, “Cosmos and Landscape,” will delve into pagan and Christian views of creation. It will also investigate the dominance of humankind over the beasts and the vegetal world, as well as modern theories of a shift from a horizontal view to a vertical perspective of the relation between the natural world and the divine, which Christianity endorsed. 

In the second lecture, “Animal and Vegetable,” Lane Fox will address the hierarchy and symbolism of animals and plants in pagan and Christian art. The impact of these views on both groups’ experience, including martyrs and Christian holy men in isolated settings, will be considered. (This lecture will be held at the British School at Rome.) 

The final lecture, “Signs and Catastrophes,” will reflect upon the previous two and compare omens and signs, prodigies and miracles, in pagan and Christian worldviews. A particular focus will be explanations of natural catastrophes, including volcanic and seismic disasters, which are still part of our world today. The lecture will conclude with reflections on the end of the world and the perverted natural symbols used to address it.

Robin Lane Fox is an ancient historian and gardening writer best known for his works on Alexander the Great. He is an emeritus fellow of New College, Oxford, and a reader in ancient history at the University of Oxford. A fellow and tutor in ancient history at New College from 1977 to 2014, Fox now serves as garden master and as extraordinary lecturer in ancient history for both New and Exeter Colleges. His major publications, for which he has won literary prizes, include studies of Alexander the Great and ancient Macedon, Christianity and Paganism, and the Greek Dark Ages. His most recent book, published in 2015, concerns the patristic author Augustine of Hippo. Lane Fox is also the gardening correspondent of the Financial Times.

Thomas Spencer Jerome (1864–1914) was an American lawyer and a lover of Roman history who lived on Capri from 1899 until his death. In his will he endowed a series of lectures to be jointly administered by the University of Michigan and the American Academy in Rome, to be delivered at both institutions. The revised lectures are typically published by the University of Michigan Press.

All lectures will be given in English. The lectures on November 6 and 12 will be livestreamed at livestream.com/aarome.

Please note: a valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Conversations/Conversazioni

Milton Gendel Tribute

  • Tuesday, 13 November 2018 - 6:00pm
Villa Aurelia
Rome
Monica Incisa, “Portrait of Milton Gendel,” 2018, pencil drawing on rag paper, after a photograph by Enrico Petrelli

This year marks the centenary of Milton Gendel, the American art critic, photographer, journalist, translator, cultural diplomat, and long-time resident of Rome, who died on October 11, two months short of his 100th birthday. After studying art history with Meyer Schapiro at Columbia University, Gendel frequented the circle of exiled European Surrealists in New York before the Second World War. He spent the final years of the conflict in the China theater, where he took up photography with a borrowed camera, a pursuit that yielded over 70,000 negatives now conserved by the Fondazione Primoli in Rome. His photographic archive represents an unparalleled and often witty record of international artistic ferment in Italy and the dramatic transformation of the country from 1950 to the present day.

The Rome correspondent for both ARTnews and Art in America, Gendel reported on artistic developments and befriended key figures, including Leo Castelli, Giuseppe Panza di Biumo, Piero Dorazio, Toti Scialoja, and Tancredi Parmiggiani, among others. His article about Alberto Burri, “Burri Makes a Picture,” remains a fundamental text on the artist’s work. Gendel was also involved in the activities of the Rome New York Art Foundation on the Tiber Island, which hosted a series of groundbreaking exhibitions from 1957 to 1962. His activities often extended beyond the visual arts. He translated Bruno Zevi’s Saper vedere l’architettura into English and worked as a speechwriter for the visionary entrepreneur Adriano Olivetti. In the 1980s, he attempted to create a Tiber Island History Museum in the Palazzo Pierleoni Caetani.

An honorary member of the Society of Fellows, Gendel and his photographs have been the focus of two exhibitions at the American Academy in Rome, in 1981 and 2011. On this occasion, an international panel will pay tribute to Gendel’s extraordinary life and work in a variety of fields. Speakers will include: Emily Braun, Distinguished Professor of Art History at Hunter College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York; Marella Caracciolo Chia, writer; Barbara Drudi, art historian;  Lindsay Harris, photography historian, 2014 Fellow, and the Academy’s Andrew W. Mellon Professor-in-Charge of the Humanities from 2014 to 2018;  Maurizio Mochetti, artist; and Adachiara Zevi, architectural historian.

Please note that space is limited; seats will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.  

The event will be held in English and Italian. Watch the livestream at https://livestream.com/aarome.

Please note: a valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Exhibition

Matera Imagined/Matera Immaginata

  • Tuesday, 13 November 2018 - 6:30pm to Tuesday, 18 December 2018 - 5:00pm
Italian Cultural Institute
New York
Carrie Mae Weems, Matera-Ancient Rome, 2006. Courtesy of Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

Matera Imagined/Matera Immaginata
November 13–December 18, 2018
Opening: November 13, 2018, 6:30 PM
Italian Cultural Institute
686 Park Avenue, New York, NY

Organized by the American Academy in Rome, this exhibition highlights how photography has framed modern perceptions of Matera, a southern Italian town noted for its millennia-old cave dwellings. A palimpsest of history and traditions characteristic of Mediterranean culture, Matera in the twentieth century was transformed in the collective imagination from an ancient backwater at the edge of civilization to a cultural bellwether for the future of Europe. In the 1940s, following the publication of Italian author Carlo Levi’s best-selling memoir, Christ Stopped at Eboli, Matera became a symbol of southern Italian backwardness. Today, just over a generation later, Matera has emerged as a model of authenticity that will represent Europe as Capital of Culture in 2019.

The exhibition charts Matera’s recent evolution through photography. It highlights for the first time the town's constant allure for photographers around the globe, as well as their pivotal role in transforming what Levi termed Matera’s “tragic beauty” into a symbol of ageless, Mediterranean place. Like filmmakers Pierpaolo Pasolini or Mel Gibson, who used Matera as a surrogate for Jerusalem, the photographers who ventured to Matera observed in its cave dwellings signs of the origins of civilization. At the same time, as was true of New Deal era photography in the United States, photography in Matera in the postwar years played a decisive role in shaping public policy, land reform, and social change. More recently, Matera has inspired artists to explore through photography concepts ranging from memory and perception, to identity and cultural patrimony. Featuring works by some of the most celebrated photographers of their time, including Henri Cartier-Bresson, Esther Bubley, Luigi Ghirri, Emmet Gowin, David Seymour, and Carrie Mae Weems, the exhibition presents a new narrative about Matera’s ancient heritage. 

Benefit

2018 New York Fall Gala

  • Wednesday, 14 November 2018 - 7:00pm
Metropolitan Club
New York City

2018 New York Fall Gala
Wednesday, November 14, 2018
Cocktails, Dinner, and Dancing

The Metropolitan Club
1 East 60th Street
New York City
Cocktail attire

Honoring Robert De  Niro, iconic actor, director, and producer, and celebrating Academy Fellows.

Co-Chairs: Alessia Antinori and Calvin Tsao, RAAR10.

An evening celebrating the unique interdisciplinary collaboration in the arts and humanities that happens every day at the American Academy in Rome.

Purchase your tickets today!

For information, please contact Amy Olweiler at 212-751-7200, ext. 363 or a.olweiler@aarome.org.

Fellow Shoptalks

Shoptalks – John Romano and Bennett Sims

  • Monday, 19 November 2018 - 6:00pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

John Romano
Tolerance of Liturgical Diversity in Medieval Europe
John Romano will speak about a particularly rich example that illustrates his thesis and approach. It involves the travels of the ambassador of the Mongols Rabban Sauma to Western Europe and the city of Rome in particular. His travelogue demonstrates the emphasis placed on correct belief, but simultaneously, the tolerance shown to diverse forms of worship.

John Romano is the Millicent Mercer Johnsen Post-Doctoral Rome Prize Fellow in Medieval Studies and associate professor in the Department of History at Benedictine College.

Bennett Sims
Pecking Order
Bennett Sims will read a short story titled Pecking Order, about a man slaughtering a chicken. It originally appeared in the Spring 2018 issue of Ploughshares.

Bennett Sims is the recipient of the Joseph Brodsky Rome Prize in Literature, a gift of the Drue Heinz Trust, and visiting assistant professor at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop at the University of Iowa.

The shoptalks will be held in English. Watch this event livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome.

Please note: a valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Fellow Shoptalks

Shoptalks – Victoria Moses and Francesco Zorzi

  • Monday, 26 November 2018 - 6:00pm
AAR Lecture Room
Rome

Victoria Moses
Meat Distribution and Consumption in Early Rome (8th6th cent. BCE)

Victoria Moses will speak about the meat distribution and consumption in Rome in the 8th–6th centuries BCE, when the city was rapidly growing into an urban center. With this increasing population size came increased demands for animals, both for meat consumed in the home and for sacrifice at Rome’s new sanctuaries. This research uses the analysis of animal bones from archaeological sites from this time period to understand meat distribution and consumption as they relate to religion and authority as the city grew. It includes newly analyzed data from Area Sacra di Sant’Omobono, Veii, Gabii, the Regia, and the Palatine.

Victoria Moses is the Lily Auchincloss/Samuel H. Kress Foundation/Helen M. Woodruff-Archaeological Institute of America Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies and PhD candidate at the School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona.

Francesco Zorzi
MACULA: The Theatre is in the Mind

Vision and perception are interconnected in a much deeper way than we imagine. Even more so when hypovision and vision loss lead to distorted vision and distorted perception. This talk is an introduction to MACULA, the project Francesco Zorzi is currently developing at AAR: and exploration of the close interrelation between eyes and brain, using design and visual art to bring awareness to macular degeneration and the visual hallucinations often associated with it, improving our understanding of what happens in the everyday reality of those who live with these conditions.

Francesco Zorzi is the Tiffany & Co. Italian Fellow in Design and a visual designer and illustrator in Amsterdam.

The event will be held in English. You can watch it livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome.

Please note: valid photo ID is required for entry into the American Academy in Rome. Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than cm 40 x 35 x 15 (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.