American Classics

Richard Gluckman – Space Framed

martedì 11 aprile 2017 18:30
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italia
Richard Gluckman - Space Framed

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: American Classics.

As part of the American Academy’s ongoing series of events exploring “American Classics,” celebrated architect Richard Gluckman will discuss the work of his firm as it is represented by interventions into historic structures, from the first project for the dia art foundation, 524 w 24th street in 1985, to current work at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archeology and Anthropology, constructed between 1895 and 1915. Projects included will range from the proposed plan for a museum in Sevilla’s ‘Atarazanas’, a ship building factory from the 13th century, to the Andy Warhol Museum, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art Perelman Wing.

Gluckman will discuss Reyner Banham’s notion of the origin of modern architecture from late 19th to early 20th century American industrial architecture as posited in ‘Concrete Atlantis’ with regard to the ‘Daylight Factory’ of Henry Ford’s River Rouge plant from 1917. This building type was re-invigorated in the 1980’s when its usefulness as a venue for large scale, site-specific work was exploited.

Richard Gluckman is the William A. Bernoudy Architect in Residence at the American Academy in Rome in the spring of 2017 and Principal at Gluckman Tang Architects in New York.

The lecture will be held in English. You can watch this event live at https://livestream.com/aarome.

Susan Meiselas – Prince Street Girls Revisited

giovedì 27 aprile 2017 18:30
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italia
Susan Meiselas - Prince Street Girls Revisited

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: American Classics.

In this lecture, award-winning photographer Susan Meiselas will discuss her reconsideration of a photographic series she produced in the late 1970s, Prince Street Girls. As Meiselas explains:

In 1975, nearly thirty-five years ago, I was riding a bicycle through my neighborhood in Little Italy when suddenly a blast of light flashed into my eyes, blinding me for a moment. Its source was a group of girls fooling around with a mirror trying to reflect the sun on my face. That was the day I met the Prince Street Girls, the name I gave the group that hung out on the nearby corner almost every day. The girls were from small Italian-American families and they were almost all related. I was the stranger who didn’t belong. Little Italy was mostly for Italians then.

The project Prince Street Girls began as a series of incidental encounters. They’d see me coming and call out, “Take a picture! Take a picture!” At the beginning I was making pictures just to share with them. If we met in the market or at the pizza parlor, they would reluctantly introduce me to their parents but I was never invited into any of their homes. I was their secret friend, and my loft became a kind of hideaway when they dared to cross the street, which their parents had forbidden.

One of the Prince Street Girls, Pebbles, moved from New York to Naples and now has a number of grandchildren. She is the starting point of my revisiting the Prince Street Girls.

Meiselas is the Henry Wolf Photographer in Residence at the American Academy in Rome in the spring of 2017.

The lecture will be held in English.

Thomas E. Crow – Rauschenberg and the Need for Myth

martedì 8 novembre 2016 18:30
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italia
Thomas E. Crow - Rauschenberg and the Need for Myth

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: American Classics.

Robert Rauschenberg spent a crucial period as a young artist in Rome and Florence. Of the works he produced at that moment, most were pitched into the Arno after a single bad review. The imprint of that sojourn took some years to re-merge, doing so when the demands of his art awakened a latent attachment to classical myth, which he rendered through outwardly, almost aggressively anti-classical means. The origins and outcomes of that paradox will be the subject of this presentation.

Thomas E. Crow is the Rosalie Solow Professor of Modern Art, and Associate Provost for the Arts at New York University. He has authored two influential studies of eighteenth-century French painting: Painters and Public Life in Eighteenth-Century Paris (1985) and Emulation: Making Artists for Revolutionary France(1995). Subsequent publications, including The Rise of the Sixties: American and European Art in the Era of Dissent and the essay collection Modern Art in the Common Culture (both 1996), examine the later twentieth century, while The Intelligence of Art (1999) analyses specific moments in the history of art. Crow’s more recent texts focus on single artists, including Gordon Matta-Clark (2003), and Robert Smithson (2004), and his most recent book, The Long March of Pop: Art, Design, and Music, 1930–1995, was published by Yale University Press in January 2015.

Thomas E. Crow is the James S. Ackerman Scholar in Residence at the American Academy in Rome in the fall of 2016.

The lecture will be held in English. You can watch this event livestreamed at https://livestream.com/aarome

The event is organized in collaboration with the Visual Studies - Rome Network (ViStuRN).

Charles Ray, Mountain Lion Attacking a Dog

giovedì 18 maggio 2017 18:00–domenica 2 luglio 2017 19:00
AAR Lecture Room and Gallery
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italia
Charles Ray, Mountain Lion Attacking a Dog

In the second of two public lectures, Charles Ray continues his discussion of his work. Immediately following the lecture, the opening of the exhibition, Charles Ray, Mountain Lion Attacking a Dog, will take place in the AAR Gallery.

In the spirit of Mark Twain’s The Innocents Abroad (1869), in which America’s mythologies about itself are brought into relief in a direct encounter with Europe, the American Academy in Rome has invited Ray to develop a new work exploring the theme of “American Classics.” This work will have its debut as part of a two-day program featuring Ray, one of the most celebrated contemporary artists working in the United States, interrogating the enduring currency in the contemporary world of cultural practices inherited from antiquity.

In Mountain Lion Attacking a Dog, Ray plays with the conventions that have defined the canons of classical sculpture. In this case, he revisits the famous Hellenistic sculptural group Lion Attacking a Horse (Greek, 325–300 BC; restored in Rome in 1594) from the Capitoline Museums, converting the naturalistic scene of primal violence, among the most storied works of art to survive from antiquity, into a typically American vernacular. In Ray’s hands, the animal group in the Capitoline, an icon of Rome much admired by Michelangelo Buonarroti, is transposed to an American wilderness increasingly encroached upon and compromised by urban sprawl. For many years, Ray has hiked in the Santa Monica Mountains, a coastal range in Southern California bound by major traffic arteries and some of the most densely settled areas of the United States. The mountains host a variety of wildlife, including a dwindling population of Mountain lions, a vestige of the storied American frontier, struggling to survive in a habitat too isolated and too small to sustain it.

Ray is the Deenie Yudell Artist in Residence at the American Academy in Rome in the spring of 2017.

In two public lectures preceding the opening of the exhibition, Ray will discuss his approach to sculpture exploring American myths informed by his close looking at the art of the past. The lectures will be held in English.

May 17, 2017

6:00pm – Lecture by Charles Ray
Contemporary Sculpture from the Past
Villa Aurelia, Porta San Pancrazio, 1

May 18, 2017

6:00pm – Lecture by Charles Ray
The Work of Charles Ray
AAR Lecture Room

6:30–9:00pm – Exhibition opening
Charles Ray, Mountain Lion Attacking a Dog
AAR Gallery

The exhibition is curated by Peter Benson Miller, Andrew Heiskell Arts Director at the American Academy in Rome.

Exhibition opening hours: Thursday, Friday, and Saturday from 4:00 to 7:00pm until July 2, 2017.

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: American Classics. The lectures and exhibition are made possible by the Syde Hurdus Foundation.

David Lang & Nicola Piovani – Soundtracks

martedì 14 marzo 2017 18:00
Villa Aurelia
Largo di Porta S. Pancrazio, 1
Rome, Italia
David Lang and Nicola Piovani - Soundtracks

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: American Classics.

In this conversation, part of the Academy’s ongoing series of events dedicated to American Classics, David Lang and Nicola Piovani will discuss their respective work for cinema, considering the importance of contemporary music to cinematic narrative.

Pulitzer-Prize winning composer David Lang contributed the songs “I Lie” and “World to Come” to the soundtrack of Paolo Sorrentino’s The Great Beauty (La Grande Bellezza), an ode to the Eternal City, which premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2013 before going on to win the Oscar for best foreign language film at the 86th Academy Awards. In the opening scene, a women’s chorus sings a Minimalist sacred composition by Lang within the vaulted spaces of the Fontana dell' Acqua Paola, on the Janiculum Hill. Lang was nominated for an Oscar for the haunting “Simple Song #3,” which he composed for Sorrentino’s La giovinezza (2015). The song sums up the complex emotional life of a retired conductor, played by Michael Caine, on vacation at a Fellini-esque spa in Switzerland. David Lang is the Paul Fromm Composer in Residence at the American Academy in Rome in the spring of 2017.

Maestro Nicola Piovani, is one of Italy’s best-known composers of film scores, with over 130 film scores to his credit, including The Night of the Shooting Stars (1982), Kaos (1984), both directed by Paolo and Vittorio Taviani, and Federico Fellini’s Ginger e Fred (1986), Intervista (1987), and La voce della luna (1990). In 1998, Piovani won the Oscar for Best Original Dramatic Score for his work on Roberto Benigni’s celebrated film La vita è bella.

The event will be conducted in English and Italian with simultaneous translation in both languages.

The 2016–17 Conversations/Conversazioni series is sponsored by the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation.

A View of One’s Own—Three Women Photographers in Rome: Esther Boise Van Deman, Georgina Masson, Jeannette Montgomery Barron

giovedì 13 ottobre 2016 18:00–domenica 27 novembre 2016 19:00
AAR Gallery
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Roma, Italia
A View of One’s Own - Three Women Photographers in Rome: Esther Boise Van Deman, Georgina Masson, Jeannette Montgomery Barron

This exhibition, drawn in part from the holdings of the Photographic Archive of the American Academy in Rome, features a selection of photographs by foreign women in Rome from three successive generations. Their work confronts aspects of the Eternal City and its urban transformation over more than a century, from the Belle Époque to the present day. At the same time, it tracks the emergence of photography as an independent medium wielded by women with distinctive viewpoints, as it evolved from a documentary aid to a vehicle for subjective, even gendered expression.

The protagonists are the American archaeologist Esther Boise Van Deman, who photographed Rome and its surroundings in the 1910s; Georgina Masson, the author of a classic guidebook, The Companion Guide to Rome, that has shaped foreigners’ experiences of Rome since the 1950s; and the contemporary photographer Jeannette Montgomery Barron, whose images capture glimpses of Rome as seen by an American living abroad in the Eternal City, folding them into a wandering, meditative reverie. Seen in succession against a photographic landscape of Rome defined for the most part by men, these photographs posit another way of seeing the city’s history. Taken by female flâneurs, empirical observations of bricks and mortar progressively dissolve into pure, evanescent experience.

A View of One’s Own is curated by Lindsay Harris, Peter Benson Miller, and Angela Piga. It is part of La Quadriennale in città (16° Quadriennale d’Arte) and FOTOGRAFIA, Festival Internazionale di Roma.

The exhibition is made possible in part by Richard Baron and Adi Shamir Baron.

Exhibition Events

Inaugural Lecture
Zoe Strauss
The Photography and the City - Philadelphia
13 October 2016
6pm, AAR Lecture Room

Lecture EVENT CANCELLED
Letizia Battaglia
The Photographer and the City - Palermo
3 November 2016
6:30pm, AAR Lecture Room

Exhibition Hours

Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays, 4pm-7pm
until 27 November 2016

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts and Humanities: American Classics.

Colm Tóibín & Sara Antonelli – On Henry James

martedì 18 ottobre 2016 18:00
Villa Aurelia
Largo di Porta S. Pancrazio, 1
Rome, Italia
Colm Tóibín with Sara Antonelli - On Henry James

This event is the Patricia H. Labalme Friends of the Library Lecture and is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: American Classics.

This year marks the centenary of the death of Henry James, the literary titan and cosmopolitan figure whose classic novels explore the culture clash between brash Americans and jaded European society. In this event, Colm Tóibín, the author of the award-winning novel The Master (2004), which unpacks James’s complex character towards the end of the writer’s life, will discuss James’s legacy with Sara Antonelli, who teaches Anglo American literature at the Università degli Studi Roma Tre.

From early novels such as The Europeans or The Portrait of a Lady, which pitted the innocence of the new world against the corruption of the old, to later works, including The Golden Bowl and The Wings of the Dove, James crafted increasingly nuanced portraits of American identities thrown into relief by their experiences abroad. Many of his stories are set against the backdrop of Rome, drawing upon James’s thorough knowledge of the inner workings of its patrician palaces and artists’ studios. James himself, however, despite his prolific output, copious letters, notebooks, novels, and plays, as well as the many portraits of him by friends, remains an enigmatic figure. This has made him and his work an alluring subject for contemporary scholars and writers, including Tóibín, who have speculated about many aspects of his personal life, including his sexual proclivities, his friendships with men and women, his relationships with his siblings, and his ill-fated interest in the theater.

The event will be held in English.

The 2016–17 Conversations/Conversazioni series is sponsored by the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation. Additional support is provided by the Embassy of Ireland in Italy.

Charles Ray – Contemporary Sculpture from the Past

mercoledì 17 maggio 2017 18:00
Villa Aurelia
Largo di Porta S. Pancrazio, 1
Rome, Italia
Charles Ray - Contemporary Sculpture from the Past

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: American Classics.

In two public lectures preceding the opening of the exhibition of his new work (one on May 17 and another on May 18, immediately preceding the exhibition opening), Charles Ray, who was been redefining the possibilities of contemporary sculptural practice since the early 1980s, will discuss his innovative approach to sculpture informed by his close looking at the art of the past. Ray is the Deenie Yudell Artist in Residence at the American Academy in Rome in the spring of 2017. The lectures will be held in English.

17 May 2017
6pm - Lecture by Charles Ray
Contemporary Sculpture from the Past
Villa Aurelia, Porta San Pancrazio, 1

18 May 2017
6pm - Lecture by Charles Ray
The Work of Charles Ray
AAR Lecture Room - Via Angelo Masina, 5

6:30–9:00pm - exhibition opening
Charles Ray, Mountain Lion Attacking a Dog
AAR Gallery

The exhibition is curated by Peter Benson Miller, Andrew Heiskell Arts Director at the American Academy in Rome.

Exhibition opening hours: Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 4pm to 7pm until 2 July 2017.

The lectures and exhibition are made possible by the Syde Hurdus Foundation.

Jason Moran – Staged

mercoledì 21 giugno 2017 18:00
Villa Aurelia
Largo di Porta S. Pancrazio, 1
Rome, Italia
Jason Moran - STAGED

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: American Classics.

As part of the ongoing series of events exploring "American Classics", celebrated musician, composer, and artist Jason Moran will discuss his ongoing investigations into the spaces inhabited by jazz performance and the residue it leaves behind. His recent exhibition STAGED, including works shown at the Venice Biennale in 2015, re-created architectural elements associated with historic jazz venues in New York from the 1940s and 1950s, such as the Savoy Ballroom and the Three Deuces, that no longer exist. For Moran, jazz is an exuberant art form, part of the living lore of the city, and an embodiment of the restlessness characterizing American society in recent years. His multivalent works examine the highly charged intersections between music, art and social history.

Awarded a MacArthur Fellowship in 2010, Moran, an electrifying jazz performer, is the Artistic Director for Jazz and the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC. He currently teaches at the New England Conservatory in Boston. Recently, he has created his own recording label, Yes Records, and launched a new magazine, LOOP, dedicated to different aspects of jazz culture. In the spring of 2018, Moran will have his first solo museum exhibition at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis.

Moran holds the Elliott Carter Memorial Residency at the American Academy in Rome for the summer of 2017.

The lecture will be held in English.

Ann Hamilton

mercoledì 24 maggio 2017 18:00
Villa Aurelia
Largo di Porta S. Pancrazio, 1
Rome, Italia
Ann Hamilton

This event is part of the series New Work in the Arts & Humanities: American Classics.

Ann Hamilton, a visual artist internationally recognized for the sensory surround of her large-scale multimedia installations, investigates the places and forms underpinning live, tactile, visceral and face-to-face experiences in a media saturated world. Her work responds to the architecture and social history of specific sites, often centering on the ephemeral acts of reading, speaking and listening. A recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship, Hamilton is the Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Art at Ohio State University, where she has served on the faculty since 2001. She represented the United States at the 1991 Bienal de São Paulo and at the 1999 Venice Biennale, and has exhibited extensively around the world.

In this talk, Hamilton will discuss a selection of projects, with special focus on her text concordances in works such as stylus (2010) and in recent photographs.

Ann Hamilton is the Roy Lichtenstein Artist in Residence at the American Academy in Rome in the spring of 2017.

The lecture will be held in English.

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