Fellow Shoptalks

Alessio Battistella & Grace Funsten

Monday, December 6, 2021–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Graphic image with "2021-22 Fellow Shoptalk" in white letters against a bright green background

Alessio Battistella
Learning from the limit

Alessio Battistella will try to demonstrate through examples that the best answer to a technical problem is not necessarily the most developed from a technological point of view, but actually the most adaptable to the context, capable of increasing the autonomy of the context itself.

Alessio Battistella is the Enel Foundation Italian Fellow in Architecture, Urban Design, and Landscape Architecture and an architect at ARCò – Architettura e Cooperazione in Milan.

Grace Funsten
Death and the Domina: The Influence of Erotic Elegy on Latin Verse Epitaphs

The talk will be focused on allusions to Augustan elegy in CIL 6.5302, an epitaph for an unnamed woman found in Columbarium 3 of the Vigna Codini. It will also consider CIL 6.5302 in the context of the other epitaphs from Columbarium 3, many of which were for slaves and freedmen of the Imperial family.

Grace Funsten is the Emeline Hill Richardson/Arthur Ross Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies and a PhD candidate in the Department of Classics at the University of Washington.

The shoptalks will be held in English.

You can watch both shoptalks live. Please register for Zoom in advance. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event.

Notice

Space in the Lecture Room is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Green Pass
  • Masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Kevin Ennis & Eric N. Mack

Monday, November 8, 2021–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Graphic image with "2021-22 Fellow Shoptalk" in white letters against a bright green background

Kevin Ennis
Materiality and Meaning in the Household Textile Industry of Hellenistic Morgantina

Kevin Ennis will be presenting on his dissertation, which analyzes the diachronic development of the household textile industry at the archaeological site of Morgantina, Sicily. In this talk, he will focus on the prevalent practice of weavers impressing and incising small decorations on their tools and consider how this practice can shed light on the relationship between weavers and their craft in antiquity.

Kevin Ennis is the Samuel H. Kress Foundation/Helen M. Woodruff/Archaeological Institute of America Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies and a PhD candidate in the Department of Classics at Stanford University.

Eric N. Mack
In austerity, stripped from its support and worn as a sarong

The shoptalk will include a slide presentation and textile-based installation in the Cryptoporticus. Eric N. Mack’s talk will be a balance of drifts and synchronicities, a constellation of meanings affirming where he has been and where he is going.

Eric N. Mack is the Philip Guston Rome Prize Fellow in Visual Art and an artist based in New York.

The shoptalks will be held in English. Ennis will present in the Lecture Room and Mack will present in the Cryptoporticus.

Notice

Space in the Lecture Room is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Green Pass
  • Masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Autumn Knight & Elena Past

Tuesday, November 2, 2021–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Graphic image with "2021-22 Fellow Shoptalk" in white letters against a bright green background

Elena Past
#FilmIsAlive: Ferrania Filmstock and the Problem of Fixing Time

Born as a munitions plant making gunpowder for the Russians, in 1918 an Italian company named Ferrania converted guncotton to celluloid and became one of few global producers of celluloid film stock. Ferrania’s filmstock was the material support for some of the most important Italian films of the twentieth century, and also for industrial documentaries and countless home movies. Although Ferrania closed in 2010 as digital claimed an increasingly large market share, today, two entrepreneurs have reopened an artisan-industrial scale factory to produce analog film: as a popular hashtag declares, #FilmIsAlive.

Elena Past’s project studies the factory through the lens of the environmental humanities, probing the enduring lives of cultural archives and the future of analog film in a digital world. Taking FILM Ferrania as her case study, her shoptalk considers why the material makeup of celluloid filmstock and the early culture of cinema led to some major challenges in preserving and archiving film. She then thinks through how the impulse to “fix time”—to stabilize the cinematic image for future viewers—creates discordant concerns about what to preserve and how to preserve it.

Elena Past is the Rome Prize Fellow in Modern Italian Studies and professor in the Department of Classical and Modern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures at Wayne State University.

Autumn Knight
Niente/Nothing

Dolce far niente/sweetness of doing nothing, is proposed in this event as a series of questions regarding time, labor, capital, laziness, respect, enjoyment. Autumn Knight will share text concerning various concepts: dolce far niente, otium, and “Southerness.”

Autumn Knight is the Nancy B. Negley Rome Prize Fellow in Visual Arts and an artist based in New York.

You can watch Elena Past’s shoptalk live. Please register for Zoom in advance. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event.

The shoptalks will be held in English.

Notice

Space in the Lecture Room is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Green Pass
  • Masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Sasha-Mae Eccleston & Keith Mitnick/Mireille Roddier

Monday, November 15, 2021–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Graphic image with "2021-22 Fellow Shoptalk" in white letters against a bright green background

Keith Mitnick/Mireille Roddier
Six Architectures in Search of an Author

In Six Architectures in Search of an Author, Keith Mitnick and Mireille Roddier will create a collection of visual stories featuring six well-known Roman edifices. Told through a variety of forms and points of view, their stories will eschew the traditional narratives generally used to depict historical works of architecture to reveal new ways of seeing them in relation to the contemporary city. With architectural models and drawings, they will overlay divergent views and “gazes” to create multilayered architectural reconstructions of Rome that, like Capriccio paintings, present new versions of la Città Eterna.

Keith Mitnick and Mireille Roddier are the Arnold W. Brunner/Frances Barker Tracy/Katherine Edwards Gordon Rome Prize Fellows in Architecture and associate professors in the A. Alfred Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Michigan.

Sasha-Mae Eccleston
Catalogues, Flows, and Synchrony’s Politics

This shoptalk is an overview of Sasha-Mae Eccleston’s classical reception book project Epic Events with a primer on its first chapter, tentatively entitled “The Rhythms of Spectacle.”

Sasha-Mae Eccleston is the National Endowment for the Humanities/Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies and John Rowe Workman Assistant Professor in the Department of Classics at Brown University

The shoptalks will be held in English. Mitnick and Roddier will present in the Lecture Room, and Eccleston will present in the Salone.

Notice

Space in the Lecture Room is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Green Pass
  • Masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Beatrice Falcucci & Randall Todd Pippenger

Monday, October 18, 2021–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Graphic image with "2021-22 Fellow Shoptalk" in white letters against a bright green background

Beatrice Falcucci
“Dall’antico al nuovo Impero”. Archaeology and natural history museums in Italian Libya

The Fascist regime initiatives in the area of propaganda exhibitions and museology were numerous and varied. Many of them have not yet been adequately investigated: those launched in Italy’s colonies, in particular, remain largely unexplored. Beatrice Falcucci’s talk highlights the surprisingly extensive network of museums (the new Museo Archeologico in Tripoli established in 1930, the Museo Libico di Storia Naturale in Tripoli inaugurated in 1936, Ptolemais museum established in 1936) and temporary exhibitions that Fascism initiated in Libya involving prominent figures from the regime and contemporary culture.

Beatrice Falcucci is the Franco Zeffirelli Italian Fellow in Modern Italian Studies and PhD in History of Science in the Department of Letters and Philosophy at Università degli Studi di Firenze.

Randall Todd Pippenger
“What’s Left Behind?”

Randall Todd Pippenger will talk about his first book project, Left Behind: Veterans, Widows, and Orphans in the Era of the Crusades, which engages larger debates about the impact of religious violence and persecution within societies, their influence on social values and family practices, and the development of the mentalités and institutions which sustain them. But more importantly, it recovers the true costs of crusading and holy war in the Middle Ages: the neglected experiences of the veterans and casualties of the crusading movement, their personal struggles and triumphs, and the lives of those they left behind—their wives and children, widows and orphans.

Randall Todd Pippenger is the Paul Mellon/Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Rome Prize Fellow and Lecturer in the Department of History at Princeton University.

The shoptalks will be held in English.

You can watch Beatrice Falcucci’s shoptalk live. Please register for Zoom in advance. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event.

Notice

Space in the Lecture Room is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Green Pass
  • Masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Eugenio Refini & Jessica Hagedorn

Monday, October 11, 2021–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Graphic image with "2021-22 Fellow Shoptalk" in white letters against a bright green background

Eugenio Refini
Only I forget not Naxos: Chasing the Fluid Echo of Ariadne’s Lament

Along with offering an overview of his book project—Ariadne’s Echo: Voice, Memory, and the Performance of Reception—in this talk Eugenio Refini will discuss tropes of fluidity that have informed the enduring afterlife of Ariadne’s lament. More specifically, he will reflect on the ways in which the interplay of gender, vocal expression, and performativity has made Ariadne’s voice resound across time and space, enabling productive reflection on the workings of reception itself.

Eugenio Refini is the National Endowment for the Humanities Rome Prize Fellow in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies and associate professor in the Department of Italian Studies at New York University.

Jessica Hagedorn
Saturday Night At Lung Fung: Creating a Mixtape Memoir

Jessica Hagedorn will talk about process, inspiration, and the ghosts that haunt this new work. There may be other surprises.

Jessica Hagedorn is the John Guare Writers Fund Rome Prize, a gift of Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Fellow in Literature and a poet, novelist, playwright, and multimedia artist in New York.

The shoptalks will be held in English.

You can watch Refini’s shoptalk live. Please register for Zoom in advance. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event.

Notice

Space in the Lecture Room is limited, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend an event with a group of over six guests or students, please inform events [at] aarome.org with at least 48 hours prior notice so that special arrangements can be made.

Guests will be asked to comply with Covid-19 safety protocols for events:

  • Access to the Academy requires the presentation of a valid photo ID and a Green Pass
  • Masks are required when indoors, and temperature will be checked before entry
  • Visitor contact information may be shared for contact tracing

Please contact events [at] aarome.org with any questions.

Backpacks and luggage with dimensions larger than 40 x 35 x 15 cm (16 x 14 x 6 in.) are not permitted on the property. There are no locker facilities available.

Christopher van den Berg & Kate Thomas

Monday, January 20, 2020–6:00 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Color photograph of Kate Thomas drinking a beverage from a large white ceramic mug

Kate Thomas

Christopher van den Berg
Fighting with Statues: Venus, Minerva, and Rome's Civil War

This talk discusses how Cicero, during Rome’s Civil War (49–46 BCE), harnessed the symbolism of Minerva, goddess of wisdom and protectress of Athens and Rome, against Julius Caesar’s genealogical connection to Venus, goddess of love. It focuses on two of antiquity’s most famous statues—Phidias’s Athena Parthenos (Minerva) and Praxiteles’s Aphrodite of Knidos (Venus)—and how Cicero discusses and alludes to them in his dialogue “Brutus” (46 BCE).

Christopher van den Berg is the Andrew Heiskell/Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies and Associate Professor, Department of Classics, Amherst College.

Kate Thomas
Lesbian Arcadia: the Villa Gamberaia at the fin-de-siecle

At the turn of the nineteenth to the twentieth century, Florence and its surrounding hills was so sought out and settled by Anglo-American expatriate lesbian artists and writers that contemporary commentators described the landscape as devoted to the “cult of women.” This lecture will focus on the Villa Gamberaia and its gardens. A highly celebrated Renaissance estate that was in decline by the nineteenth century, the Villa was lovingly restored by the Princess Ghyka and her partner Florence Blood from 1896 to 1925. She will explore how the garden’s features of nymphaeum, water parterre, secret garden, grotto and bosco can be seen to express what the novelist EM Forster called a “gay greenwood.” Drawing on recent theory on “vibrant matter” and “plant thinking” that see landscapes as mobile, sentient and desiring, she will reach toward a reading of how ruined and reinvented Italian landscapes shaped modern queer, particularly lesbian, cultural estate.

Kate Thomas is the Garden Club of America Rome Prize Fellow in Landscape Architecture and K. Laurence Stapleton Professor of English, Bryn Mawr College.

The shoptalks will be held in English.

Watch the Livestream
 

Peter Streckfus – Reading from “Errings,” His Collection of Poetry

Tuesday, April 1, 2014–6:30 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Peter Streckfus - Reading from his collection of poetry: Errings

Peter Streckfus, recipient of the Joseph Brodsky Prize, a gift of the Drue Heinz Trust/American Academy of Arts and Letters, will read from his newly released collection of poetry, Errings.

Bradley Cantrell – Responsive Landscapes

Thursday, April 10, 2014–6:30 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Bradley Cantrell - responsive landscapes

Bradely Cantrell, Garden Club of America Rome Prize Fellow in Landscape Architecture, will give a shoptalk entitled Responsive Landscapes.

Max Page – The Arc of Memory and the Arc of Justice: Bending the Future of Historic Preservation

Tuesday, April 8, 2014–6:30 PM
AAR Lecture Room
Via Angelo Masina, 5
Rome, Italy
Max Page - The Arc of Memory and the Arc of Justice: Bending the Future of Historic Preservation

Max Page, Mark Hampton Rome Prize Fellow in Historic Preservation and Conservation, will give a shoptalk entitled The Arc of Memory and the Arc of Justice: Bending the Future of Historic Preservation.

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